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notes2Notes to Chapter II:

1

. Deford, 224.

2. Gorer, 80-1.

3. "Men Didn't Flinch at Fashion Show," New York Times 1 Sept. 1903: 9.

4. Alexander, 28.

5. "Fashion Show Opening," New York Times 1 Sept. 1903: 3.

6. Diana de Marly, Worth: Father of Haute Couture (London: Elm Tree, 1980) 140.

7. Duff-Gordon, 67, 69-70.

8. O. Henry, pseud. "The Buyer From Cactus City," The Trimmed Lamp: And OtherStories of the Four Million (New York: Doubleday, 1920) 73-4.

9

. Claudia B. Kidwell and Margaret C. Christman, Suiting Everyone: TheDemocratization of Clothing in America (Washington: Smithsonian, 1974) 137-9.

10. "Plenty of Pockets in Suffragette Suit," New York Times 10 Oct. 1910:5.

11. Advertisement, San Francisco Call 10 Sep. 1911: 30.

12. "Wonderlands," 11.

13. "Apricot Colored Directoire Seen," San Francisco Call 17 Jul. 1908:16.

14. "Wears Sheath Gown on Van Ness Avenue," San Francisco Call 17 Jul.1908: 16.

15. "Women's Gowns and Hats are Works of Art," San Francisco Call 15 Sep.1911: 11.

16. Grace Armistead Doyle, "Stunning Frills from Paris on Display," SanFrancisco Chronicle 12 Mar. 1914: 13.

17

. Grace Armistead Doyle, "Even Mere Man is Interested in theDisplay," San Francisco Chronicle 13 Mar. 1914: 9.

18. "Style Display by Local Merchants," San Francisco Call 10 Sep. 1911:29.

19. Diehl, 7.

20. Diehl, 7-8.

21. Duff-Gordon, 78.

22. Lowry, "Rude," 19.

23. Clarice Stasz Stoll, Female and Male: Socialization, Social Roles and SocialStructure (Dubuque: Wm. C. Brown, 1974) 116-8.

24. Banner, 151-3.

25. "The Weaker Sex No Longer," Harper's Bazaar V. XLV, No. 2, Feb. 1911:57.

26. Marly, 175.

27

Barbara McFarland and Tyeis Baker-Baumann, Shame and Body Image:Culture and the Compulsive Eater (Deerfield Beach: Health Communications, 1990) 47.

28. McFarland, 67.

29. Perutz, 213.

30. Linda Tschirt Sanford and Mary Ellen Donovan, Women and Self Esteem (GardenCity: Anchor, 1984) 373-4.

31. Sanford, 372.

32. McFarland, 66.

33. McFarland, 66-7.

34. McFarland, 67.

35. McFarland, 67.

36. Perutz, 213.

37

. Perutz,233.

38. Perutz, 225.

39. Sanford, 378-9.

40. Alexander, 3-5.

41. Minsky, 141.

42. Bernard Sobel, Burleycue: An Underground History of Burlesque Days (New York:Rinehart, 1931) 265.

43. Sobel, Burleycue, 267, 272.

44. "Misty" pseud., Strip! (Toronto: New Press, 1973) 179.

45. Gorer, 54-5.

46. Gorer, 48-55.

47. Elsom, 181.

48. Alexander, 10-11.

49. English, 53.

50

. Reginald Marsh, Gaiety Burlesk. Illus. on p 128 of ReginaldMarsh, by Lloyd Goodrich (New York: Abrams, 1972).

51. Reginald Marsh, Eltinge Follies. Illus. on p 199 of Reginald Marsh, byLloyd Goodrich (New York: Abrams, 1972).

52. Alexander, 26.

53. Gary, Stripper

54. Gale Miller, "Entertainment as Deviant Work," Odd Jobs: The World ofDeviant Work (Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1978) 187.

55. Corio, 9-10, 14.

56. Zeidman, 137, 139.

57. Alexander, 14-16.

58. Alexander, 17-19.

59. Corio, 72.

60

. Minsky, 33-4.

61. Zeidman, 144.

62. Minsky, 112-5.

63. Nancy Friday, Men in Love, Men's Sexual Fantasies: The Triumph of Love Over Rage (NewYork: Dell, 1980) 37-8.

64. Friday, Men 86.

65. Warren Jamison, "Dear Abby," San Francisco Chronicle 12 Mar. 1990: F10.

66. "Misty," 185-6.

67. Susan Brownmiller, Femininity (New York: Fawcett, 1984) 41.

68. Daphina Ayalah and Issac Weinstock, Breasts: Women Speak About Their Breasts andTheir Lives (New York: Summit, 1979) 75.

69. Blaze Starr and Huey Perry, Blaze Starr; My Life as Told to Huey Perry (NewYork: Simon and Schuster, 1974) 210-11.

70

. Tempest Storm and Bill Boyd, Tempest Storm: The Lady is a Vamp (Atlanta:Peachtree, 1987) 99-100.

71. Tom Wolfe, The Pump House Gang (New York: Bantam, 1968) 70.

72. Gilbert Seldes, "Sugar and Spice and Not so Nice," Esquire Jan. 1934:120.

73. John Hays, "Playboy Forum," Playboy Feb. 1980: 55.

74. Anonymous, "Playboy Forum," Playboy Feb. 1980: 55.

75. Friday, Men 15-16.

76. Gorer, 43.

77. Gorer, 48.

78. Minsky, 97.

79. Zeidman, 152.

80. Zeidman, 155-6.

81. "Misty", 119.

82. Banner, 249-54.

83

. Deford, 111-2.

84. Deford, 119, 248, 270.

85. Deford, 115-6.

86. Banner, 266.

87. Helen Bullit Lowry, "Innocence at Atlantic City," New York Times 11Sep. 1921: III 6.

88. Lowry, "Innocence," III 6.

89. Deford, 193-6.

90. Miss Universe, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA (Los Angeles: Madison Square GardenTelevision Productions, 1988) n.p.

91. Burwell, 17.

92. 1990 Judge's Committee, 8-9.

93. Farris, 89-91.

94

. Deford, 68.

95. Deford, 250-4.

96. "YWCA Opens War on Beauty Contests," New York Times 18 Apr. 1924: 21.

97. "Women Condemn Beauty Pageants," New York Times 18 Apr. 1924: 21.

98. "Attacks Bathing Review," New York Times 11 Sep. 1923: 15.

99. "Miss Indianapolis is Prettiest Girl," New York Times 8 Sep. 1922:17.

100. Deford, 129-30.

101. Burwell, xvi.

102. 1990 Judges, 8-9.

103. Sandra McElwaine, "The Deadly Serious Game of the Beauty Pageant," CosmopolitanSep. 1989: 219.

104. Hadley Cantril, Ed., Public Opinion 1935-1946 (Princeton: Princeton U, 1951)1044.

105

. Deford, 167.

106. George Gallup, The Gallup Poll: Public Opinion 1972-1977 (Wilmington:Scholarly Resources, 1978) 702.

107. George Gallup Jr., The Gallup Poll: Public Opinion 1984 (Wilmington: ScholarlyResources, 1985) 120.

108

. "Contrary to popular belief, size---at least the Misses sizerange now applicable to adult women does not 'arbitrarily assign number codes for eachsize.' There was, once, a meaning to the numbers. In the beginning, size was not a size atall, but an age. A size 12 was meant for a 'miss' of age 12...Adult women were presumed tohave well-developed, 'mature figures' with low hiplines and bustlines, both significantlylarger than waistlines...'Misses' sizes were designed pure and simple for misses, oradolescent girls...the 1901 Sears, Roebuck catalog advised...'A misses garment, whilemeasuring 34 or 36 inches around the bust, will not fit a well-developed woman measuringthe same'...intended for an adolescent body, [it] was cut straighter through the torso,with less of an indentation for waist, less pronounced hips, than the women's sizes. Whenthe concept of 'misses' sizes was later extended to all adult women, one basic fact wentalong on the garment rack: In early maturity, for which misses sizes were originallyintended...90% of people can fit standard sizes for those ages...but by 20 to 24 yearsonly about half the adults can be cared for with standard sizes...from...45 up, only athird can be fitted with standard sizes. Today's system of fashion...makes figurevariability an oddity, instead of recognizing it as the prevailing biological fact that itis."--Hara Estroff Marano, Style is Not A Size (New York: Bantam, 1991) 16-17.

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