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TaraBookprojectsHead cabbage

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Turning Your Head Into a CabbageTurning Your Head Into a Cabbage

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Rough idea of how I'd write up this project (using a cabbage hat example instead):

What you need:

A wooden or foam head or hat form in a size larger than the performer's head.

A plastic bag to cover the form

White glue that dries clear (nontoxic)

craft paint brush

plastic container

water

Craft felt pieces and scraps

T-pins or other strong pins

Newspapers or plastic to cover your workspace

latex gloves

2 large rubber bands

craft scissors

paint if desired

Render your hat design on paper to give yourself a plan to work towards. You may end up changing your plan slightly, but starting without a plan is definitely a mistake. The instructions below detail how to do a V-Day "Rose" hat like the one shown, but you may choose to design a different style of hat and can extrapolate your own process based on your design crossed with the instructions below.

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Cover your workspace with plastic or newspapers, bag your head form in the plastic bag, and use a rubber band to hold the bag close to the head without a lot of air space.

254images254photos44034.jpg Cut a circle or square of craft felt to make the base cap of the hat. Make sure it covers the head fully.

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254images254projects55005.jpg Mix glue and water together in the plastic container about 50-50, and pour and brush the glue into the felt cap, stretching it around the head as you go.

254images254photos44037.jpg Put the second rubber band around the cap, and use it as a guide for stretching the pleats out of the cap.

254images254photos44038.jpg Pull some more, and add pins to hold it smoothly.

254images254photos44039.jpg Cut a piece of felt to make the pleated section in the center of the flower, soak it in the glue mixture, and fold it in pleats onto the surface of the cap.

254images254photos44041.jpg Cut, soak and attach the layers of felt that make the petals.

254images254photos44042.jpg Pin at strategic points as you go, to hold the layers down for a few minutes each till they have had a chance to stick.

254images254photos44043.jpg Keep adding layers, in lighter shades of pink, till the cap is totally covered with pleated petals.

254images254photos44046.jpg add glue and pins as you go.

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254images254photos44050.jpgLet dry till it is semi-soft, but still holds together. If it dries too long, it will take pliers to get your pins out:

254images254projects55004.jpg Force the hat off of the head (difficult). Then use craft shears to cut off the excess felt from the bottom of the cap piece:

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254images254projects55008.jpgAllow to dry completely before painting or adding any decorations.

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This Page is part of The Costumer's Manifesto, originally founded by Tara Maginnis, Ph.D. from 1996-2014, now flying free as a wiki for all to edit and contribute. Site maintained, hosted, and wikified by Andrew Kahn. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details. You may print out any of these pages for non-profit educational use such as school papers, teacher handouts, or wall displays. You may link to any page in this site.