COSTUMES.ORG -- THE COSTUMER'S MANIFESTO WIKI

Difference between pages "Advice1pagesHowtopat" and "Advice1pagesResearch"

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Costume How-to, advice and pattern links
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The Costumer's Manifesto: Research Heresy
  
'''How-To Advice Links'''
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''' RESEARCH HERESY'''
  
(Halloween How-to Tips located
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==RESEARCH==
  
[[Store100pagesHalloween|Here]]General
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HERESY: As a high school student it was my ambition to become a librarian. As a result, my first paying job, as well as years of volunteer jobs and classes, were spent in libraries, working, studying their systems, and hiding out. This put me at a singular advantage all through college and grad school, and I was generally regarded by students and faculty alike as a sort of guru of library research. I could, and did, do major graduate research papers on obscure subjects in 3-7 days, start to finish, and get highest marks. So it was no greatsurprise to me when the faculty asked me to do a seminar on research for the assembled faculty and students in the department's weekly lecture series. The faculty sat down expecting I'd give a serious harangue to my fellow students encouraging them to stick their noses to the grindstone of the library, and the students braced to snooze through yet another "scholarly paper". I seemed to shock everybody, pleasantly or unpleasantly as the case may be, by actually explaining how I did my research. You see, because I understood the system, I understood how to "cheat" the system. So I explained that one could get information out of the library in bulk, in less time, without so much "nose to the grindstone." I was, I'm afraid, even flip about it. And I admitted that the recent research paper I wrote that was considered by the faculty to be "of publishable quality" on French Revolutionary Festivals, was in fact the product of one weekend's cramming. Well, the students didn't fall asleep, and my advisers were looking not at all happy with me, but, I thought: '''"I have a mission here---I must lead the righteous to the path of better grades, no matter what the cost!" '''So I did. And here is my lecture (with some new tricks I've learned since):
  
'''
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THE
  
[[Advice1pagesIndexm|The Costumer's Manifesto]] free online book of advice to costumers '''
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==LAZY==
  
[[Advice1pagesIntro|INTRODUCTION]]
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MECHANIC: First, to preface my system for doing library research, let me explain the story of the Lazy Mechanic and the Industrious Mechanic. According to my Dad, who comes from a line of machinists, engineers and other early technocrats, it's better for a factory to hire a lazy mechanic to service it's machines, than an industrious one. He says that an industrious mechanic will carefully oil, and service and repair a machine so that it works perfectly (with lots of his help and labor) and never needs replacing. This will leave you with an outdated and labor inefficient machine, that is in too good a repair to justify scrapping. A lazy mechanic, on the other hand, doesn't want to spend his day oiling and repairing and servicing. So he will use his mechanical knowledge to alter the machine to make it more efficient, (expending extra time at the beginning), so he needn't work on it for the future. He will also ignore doing any kind of servicing that isn't actually necessary to the operation of the machine. In short, he will expend his energy on making it a better machine, rather than maintaining an inefficient status quo. This is one of life's important lessons. If something takes a lot of time, trouble, and effort to do, when it is something that should be simple, chances are that the system is set up wrong. In this case you need to apply your effort to finding a better system that works faster, rather than simply dumping all your effort into forcing an inefficient method to work for you. This will take extra time at the beginning, and save you time in the long run.
  
[[Advice1pagesEthics10|"The Manifesto" a Statement of Purpose and Ethics for Costumers]]
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[[File:AmazonBooks4Guidetoperformingartsprograms.jpg|RESEARCHLAZY]]
  
[[Advice1pagesFaking|FAKING CREATIVITY]]
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[[File:AmazonBooks4Petersonsprofesssionaldegreeprograms.jpg]]
  
[[Advice1pagesFlex|FLEX YOUR HEAD MENTAL AEROBICS]]
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[[File:AmazonVideo3Manwithamoviecamera.jpg]] (Classic Soviet film)
  
[[Advice1pagesStealing|IDEA STEALING]]
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THE
  
[[Advice1pagesTheory|DEEP THEORY]]
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==PROBLEM==
  
[[Advice1pagesResearch|RESEARCH HERESY]]
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WITH THE SYSTEM: Doing research in the visual arts in a normal library is one of those inefficient systems that need fixing. There is a simple reason for this. Libraries are predominantly set up for books. Books are predominantly set up for the words in the books. Library systems therefore are based on the assumption that you are looking for information, in the books, in the words. Card catalogs and computers in libraries file everything, books, pamphlets, maps, charts, posters, everything, based on the words in/on them. Ditto online search engines. The problem is, '''you are looking for the pictures'''. This is a very big problem. The bigger the library, the bigger the problem. The solutions are relatively simple, if time consuming. The "sensible" library approved solution is to deeply think about the subject you are looking for, and to think of related subject headings, based on the words in the books, that might lead you to the pictures. This is a good system to begin with, (and the only one you can use with search engines) but it is still a case of working within the inefficient system. It works, sort of, but it will swallow lots of time each time you use it. It also presupposes that you know a lot about the subject you are researching before you even begin.
  
[[Advice1pagesPortfoli|PORTFOLIOS AND RESUMES]]
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==WHY IT WORKS==
  
[[Store100pagesShop|COSTUME SHOP & COSTUME SHOP SAFETY]]
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BADLY: For example, you are looking for costume ideas for a play by Chekhov written in 1905. What are the best subject headings to find costume pictures? If you answer Russian costume, Chekhov, and Russian history in 1905, you will get books showing colorful peasant dress, play scripts without pictures and lots on the Revolution of 1905, all of which will help you very little. What you needed to look up was Photography in Russia before 1917, the painters Valentin Serov and Mikhail Vrubel, the history of the Moscow Art Theatre and Konstantin Stanislavsky, and the costume collection of the Hermitage Museum. How do you find this out? There is no way, working within the regular library system that you can find this out except by hitting subjects at random (Russian painting, history, sculpture, engravings, photos, costume, etc., etc.) and hoping you hit one that will stick. It is different for each country and period and play. There is no escape. Or is there?
  
[[Advice1pagesPhoto|TAKING STAGE PHOTOGRAPHS]]
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==SWALLOW==
  
[[Advice1pagesWithin|THE COSTUMER WITHIN]]
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THE WHOLE THING: For the long run, there is. It just costs you a lot of time at the beginning. What you will need to do is to abandon the filing system and embrace the whole library for several days. In a large university library (your best bet) you just go to the top floor and work down. You begin at the beginning of the stacks, and walk them. That is to say you look at the titles on each and every shelf, no exceptions, and when a title or a binding looks interesting, you pull it off the shelf, and look for pictures. Four out of five books you pull out will be duds. When you find a good one, write down its call number and it's subject heading. Save these notes for later. My first published Article,
  
[[Advice1pagesTravel|TRAVEL FOR THE SOUL]]
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[[Advice1pagesLiblist|PROBLEMWHY IT WORKSSWALLOWLibrary Costume Resources; A Supplement]]was a list of subject headings and call numbers I compiled in just four hours of walking through the stacks of the CSU Fresno library:
  
[[Advice1pagesSalaryrespect|Salary and Respect]]
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==KNOW==
  
[[Advice1pagesQuotes|COSTUME SHOP QUOTES]]
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WHAT YOUR LIBRARY HAS: Most major research libraries have many sections, all of which contain information on costume, and all of which you should "walk". The main section is what is called the stacks, these are stacks of books, available for checking out and wandering through, usually filed according to the Library of Congress system. In addition to this main section are many others. First, usually extra large books are filed in an oversize book section or sections as part of the main stacks, this area contains a large proportion of costume information. The reference section has books too valuable for check out, and books that are references for other books and information. These include indexes like The Readers Guide To Periodical Literature that can help you find articles in magazines on your subject. Within the reference section is usually the reference desk collection, normally only used by the reference librarians. These are exclusively indexes useful for finding other works, including indexes of periodicals, videos, and organizations that may be useful. Also in the reference area are computer databases that list articles and books available in your library, your region, and even sometimes on the database itself. Most large libraries also have video, film and audio collections, a map collection, new and old periodicals (magazines and newspapers), rare book collections (which include not only books, but other fragile old items like photos, stereographs, fashion plates, paper dolls, posters, theatre programs, manuscripts, renderings, letters, drawings, and scrapbooks), and a regional collection (with local "rare books").
  
[[Advice1pagesSewmachn|THINGS NOBODY TELLS YOU ABOUT SEWING MACHINES]]
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A REALLY
  
[[Advice1pagesDeardrtara|Costume and Trivia Advice]]
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==BIG==
  
[[Advice1pagesJobdescription|What Do You do as a Costume Designer for a Living?]]
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LIBRARY: A very large American library also is likely to be a Federal Government Depository Library, which means it will have government publications filed by an annoying system understandable only to a special librarian stationed in that section to help you. For posters of the history of American military dress, info on W.W.II civilian home made clothing, and Smithsonian publications, this is the source. The 100 biggest libraries in the US were also given, on B&W microfilm, a complete copy of all Sears Catalogs from the beginning in the late 19th Century to the 1970's (Oh, rapture!) Big universities often have to break up their libraries into several buildings across campus, and so often have a law library, science or medical library, and a business or technical library. These places need to be explored as well. For instance, at UGA those Sears Catalog microfilms live in the UGA Science Library. Books on period cutting, sewing, and millinery, will be located in a technical library if one is kept separate from the main library. Business libraries have information on unions (photos of strikers and police), servants, prostitutes, farm workers, garment workers, and the textile industry. Big libraries also have the Union List of Periodicals, and other massive library indexes useful for finding very obscure books that you may order through interlibrary loan. Many also have microfilm and microfiche collections with works too bulky to get in print. For example, the Victoria and Albert Museum has sold color microfiche copies of a large selection of the theatre costume and couture renderings in their collection to libraries, many more than could reasonably be copied in a large book.
  
[[Advice1pagesPhoto4portfoliocc04|Photographing Your Costumes for Your Portfolio, Onstage and in the Studio ]](handout from Costume College 2004.)
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THE
  
[[Advice1pagesPhoto4portfoliocc04b|Same text as above, but interspersed with the images that were used as slides for the lecture]]
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==MAGIC==
  
[[Advice1pagesAdvice22|How do you make those fluffy elbow ruffles you see on 18th Century Saque gowns?]]
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AP'S: Within the periodical section is one of those sections you would never likely find in a conventional catalog search, the "general interest" section known in the Library of Congress system as AP. AP's include all such general interest magazines as TimeLifeThe Ladies Home JournalGodey's Lady's Book, etc. If the main content of the magazine is not fashion, but "general interest", no matter how much fashion information is in it, it is filed in this section. Naturally since most of "women's magazines" fall into this category, it means it contains huge amounts of costume information under one, non-costume, heading. Since big libraries often have collections of magazines in this section going back to the 19th, or even 18th centuries, it is an extremely useful one for getting contemporary fashion information, photos of important figures, and even patterns for clothing, just by looking up magazines in the period you need. If your library doesn't seem to have old periodicals on the shelf, check and ask. Usually there are older volumes filed either in a separate old periodicals section, or the old volumes are on microfilm or microfiche in metal cabinets nearby.
  
[[Advice1pagesHow_do_you_get_to_visit_a_study_|How do you get to visit a study collection of costumes in a museum?]]
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LOOK FOR
  
[[Advice1pagesCommunitythearecure|I'm in Community Theatre Costume Hell. How do I get these people to act like professionals?]]
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==RED BOOKS==
  
[[Advice1pagesAdvice23|where do I find research materials for 1905 Russian Jews]]
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: One of the bizarre things to keep in mind is that books with lots of pictures often are in standard sizes. Art books with color reproductions of paintings are often kept in the oversize book shelves, and so this part of the library should always be checked extra carefully. Other books come in sizes that you will eventually recognize from experience to be likely picture books. Another clue is gold letters on red binding. For reasons known only to the publishing industry, very many books with this color combination also contain pictures. Pull anything that you suspect contains interesting visuals, and write down the numbers that are useful.
  
[[Advice1pagesAdvice6|how to make Big Hair]]
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TAKE
  
I'm a Heterosexual Transvestite who needs advice on
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==NOTES==
  
[[Advice1pagesAdvice2|body padding so my dresses will fit better.]]
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FOR LATER: While doing this systematic search for''' all''' important visual costume information in your library, you will be acquiring information even more randomly than by hunting subject headings, however you will be gathering much more visual information in total than you could do in dozens of subject searches. You also cut out the word based dead ends much more quickly, by bypassing them altogether. You may also use this system backwards with the subject heading system. That is, once you have your list of numbers and headings which are useful, you can apply them to other parts of the library like periodicals, reference, and government publications to find even more information. These sections too must be walked and mined for numbers and headings on their own. Once you do this you will be able to easily put your hands on three fourths of whatever you need for costume research for a show within an hour or less. There will still be that one fourth that obstinately will require a conventional catalog search, but by doing this walk through the stacks just once, you will have the majority of your costume research gathering done before you even start. You can then concentrate your time on using your research instead of finding it.
  
How do I teach a little girl's soccer team how to
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THE
  
[[Advice1pagesAdvice3|tie dye their uniform socks]]
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==OBSTINATE==
  
[[Advice1pagesAdvice4|What is "RIT spray dye"?]]
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1/4 THAT NEEDS A NORMAL SEARCH: You can shorten the search several ways. One is that you choose a wide variety of related headings, but only take enough notes to get to the right stack. That is, when looking for Inuit dress for the children's show The Ice Wolf, you look up Inuitdress, art, textiles, history, photographs, tools, religion, Native American costume, art, textiles, history, photographs, tools, religion, and circumpolar dress, art, etc. in the catalog, making the broadest possible search, but you do not write down or print out every number. Instead, you look at the numbers in each subject section, and write down only one each of similar numbers. This is enough to bring you to the proper shelf, where you can hunt using the visual system. If a particular title in the catalog seems promising, right down that number as the sample number for it's section. This way you can often find a hundred books while only writing down a dozen numbers. Another important option in conducting a normal search is to ask a reference librarian for help. Reference librarians have MA's in library science, which means they spent two whole years studying library systems, research, and reference books. In a conventional search, they are the unquestioned experts, and can often shorten your time spent considerably. Taking a course or two in library science yourself, will also make doing conventional searches faster.
  
[[Classes254pagesThr254projects|THR 254 Costume Design & Construction Projects at The Costumer's Manifesto]]
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==FILE IT==
  
Suit Conversions
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IN YOUR HEAD: Over a very long time, of course, there is another solution. You learn enormous amounts about costume history, and can retrieve them from memory. To do this, you need to make a point of checking out and reading/looking at all the good books you find, one by one, till you can accurately do period shows, without a large scale research search. To do this kind of systematic mining of costume information for your lifetime, I recommend Janet Arnold's A Handbook of Costume, which contains "the word" on how to do costume research from the leading costume historian in the world. Janet said, among other things, that costume research does not stop with picture books, but should also take you to museums, archives, and old houses to see actual garments, paintings, sculpture, accessories, legal documents like patent records, and so forth. Ms Arnold practiced what she preached. The costume world knew Ms. Arnold was the most determined and dedicated costume researcher when her Patterns of Fashion 3, came out, and we saw she had made patterns from 16-17th Century clothing that was in an advanced state of decay. The decay came from the fact that these garments were grave clothes and had spent a long time with a decaying body in each one. (Yuck!) Thinking about the dedication it must have took for Ms. Arnold to do this should convince anyone that library research, even with all it's difficulties, is, comparatively, a piece of cake.
  
[[254pagesProjectsPaintedsuits|Paint]]
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A LOW
  
[[254pagesProjectsApplieddecorsuit|Applied Decoration]]
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==DIRTY==
  
[[254pagesProjectsSurrealpockets|Surrealist Pockets]]
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TRICK: While I do not recommend this method for anyone who is not truly desperate, it does work. If you are truly "stuck" on a particular costume (usually a uniform in my experience), and are in some remote place where you cannot possibly drive to the next city to look for further information, and you have exhausted all the local sources, you can go to the video store. (WHAT!!!) Yes, sometimes you have no alternative. For example, in Fairbanks, Alaska I had looked for days in the largest library in the State for a picture of a prisoner in a 1953 Russian gulag winter uniform. The best I got was the fuzzy B&W photo of Solzhenitsyn, from the waist up, in The Gulag Archipelago. I needed something clear, in color, and full length. So, I rented A Day in the Life of Ivan Desinovitch, and took notes. The reason that doing this is not advisable, except in an emergency, is that''' if the film costumer had made a mistake in research, I would have promptly perpetuated it.''' However, one may generally avoid this by being careful about which movies one rents, and which pieces one steals from them. One should never, for instance, steal costumes worn on leads, because usually they are altered to suit the fashions of the period the film was made in. It is both unnecessary, and dangerous to take bits of fashionable, non-uniform dress from movies, since you can get this information elsewhere, and these parts too are sometimes altered. Movies done before 1960 are often highly fanciful in terms of costume, as are deliberately stylized movies like Bram Stoker's DraculaThe Boy Friend, and anything directed by Ken Russell. In general, the best films to steal from are large budget, post 1960 English made films, and post 1970 European films. There are many highly historically accurate American made films, particularly westerns, but there are an equal number of fanciful, and plain sloppy ones, so it isn't safe as a bet. For more on the alteration of costume history in film costume read The LA County Museum of Art's Hollywood and History, and Seeing Through Clothes by Anne Hollander. The safest films in terms of uniform hunting are those with Berman's and Nathan's, Angel's or Cosprop as the costume makers, and John Mollo as consultant or designer. So this means if you just got stuck to do The Cherry Orchard, and can't find what a Turn of the Century Russian station master, student, and post man look like, you can rent Nicholas and Alexandra, and Dr. Zhivago, and make do, because these two films contain those three uniforms between them.
  
[[254pagesProjectsSuitcollarchange|Changing Collars]]
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AN
  
Masks
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==INDUSTRIAL==
  
[[254pagesProjectsPlastermask|Plaster Bandage & Foam]]
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REVOLUTION IN RESEARCH: Using this system will speed up your research considerably. However, there is something else that will speed it up more. The Xerox machine can, if you let it, double your time on top of it. The first secret is getting a library copy card, so you don't mess about with dimes. Then, when you have found your books, do not check them out, but rather, in the library, quickly scan for what you want and copy it. Return to the stacks and get more books. Copy them. Repeat. You can walk out of the library in under three hours, with all the pertinent information from 100 books, in a small folder. This saves considerable hauling, and leaves the books back at the library, where others who are working on the same show can get at them. If you staple up these folders into booklets each time you do this, you will end up with a compact research library of specialized period information. As things are, back home, you will have only one booklet to look through for your source material, as compared with fumbling around through dozens scattered all over your room.
  
[[254pagesProjectsFoamairballmask|Foam and Airball on a Plastic Base]]
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==WRITING==
  
[[254pagesProjectsInsulationfoam|Carved Insulation FoamMask]]
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RESEARCH PAPERS AND ARTICLES: Because most costume jobs and training in the U.S. are connected with academia, costumers also must, as students and professors, write research papers with footnotes and quotes. You may speed up your research from word based sources by using the above Xerox system with a few alterations. First, you must, when gathering up your books, make a list of the author, title, date, and publisher of each book. Then assign each of these titles an abbreviation, also written down. Then as you copy relevant pages out of the books, write the abbreviation and page number of the book on the back of each Xerox. When at home, read the pages, putting highlighter on those sections you think you wish to use as quotes and footnotes. Divide the pages of quotes by subject, then order each section, and each page in a section, into the order in which you wish to discuss your topics. If necessary, cut and paste pieces of pages into proper order, but always remember to keep note of the abbreviation and page for each part you use. When it is all in order, you may start writing. You will find your writing will easily follow the path of your source material with a flow you have rarely felt before. As you use some part of the Xeroxes in reference or quotation, you may easily footnote it by comparing the abbreviation on the Xerox with the list you made at the beginning. All this saves days of inefficient fumbling about with stacks of books, and also makes it far harder to lose or forget small references. Staple together this sort of research too, and you'll have a source book to check back on if you need it later.
  
or
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[[Advice1pagesInstantr|KNOWBIGMAGICRED BOOKSNOTESOBSTINATEFILE ITDIRTYINDUSTRIALWRITINGINSTANT RESEARCH PAPERS]]
  
[[254pagesProjectsInsulationfoam|Foam Mold for Muslin Mask ]]
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Three People have written in with improvements to my ideas! Here they are:
  
[[254pagesProjectsWireframe|Wire Sculpture]]
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I just stumbled onto your _Research Heresy_ article, and what a great find! I work as an image researcher (mostly historical stuff) and have discovered many of the same tricks that you mention. I swear I can smell a heavily illustrated book from a distance at this point!
  
[[254pagesProjectsMuslinmachemask|Muslin Mache Mask ]]
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I also have a Master's in Library Science, and would like to share a little secret to help narrow down catalog searches. The official Library of Congress Subject Heading for "lots and lots of images" is PICTORIAL. Sometimes I'll do a catalog search on a broad topic keyword (such as Civil Rights) plus the keyword "pictorial." One of the advantages of this method is that I can request that a specific book be returned to the library if it's checked out, whereas I would have missed it entirely by browsing the stacks.
  
Sewing
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Keep up the good work, and happy hunting!
  
[[254pagesProjectsRenaissancehat|Renaissance Hat]]
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Sincerely,
  
[[254pagesProjectsCape|Cape]]
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You seem to have developed the same research style I did - pillage and burn through the right sectors, scavenging anything that looks useful. Two refinements to the technique. Make a photocopy of the title page to use for the bibliography information. And, keep a notebook to list of what you have looked at and whether it seems useful for the current or future projects. I have a long list of books to ignore, a list of books that would be useful on other projects, and those that are good for the current one. (I'm a technical writer not a costumer, but research is research.) ---
  
Paperwork
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I also read you article on research and enjoyed it. I am also a trawl-net bibliophile. I have a tip to add: rather than using abbreviations to track photocopies of materials to be footnoted I write the call no. on a small <post-it> and Xerox the ISBN page at the beginning of the book with the post-it attached, this page has author/title/publisher/date/LC# on it so I don't have to copy them out... then I slap the post-it in the margin of each page I copy... the yellow is invisible to most B&W copiers and the call
  
[[254pagesProjectsMeasurements|Measurements]]
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number links me to the copy of the bibliographic info and will lead me directly to the book on the stack shelf if I have to go back and pull it again... I developed this procedure as well as copying from back to front (in order to avoid collating after the fact) in the course of my information-panning all libraries large and small that ever cross my path." ---Dan Wasserman Coord. Adult Education, St. Louis Art Museum e-mail:
  
[[254pagesProjectsPortfolio|Building Your Portfolio]]
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==SAVING==
  
[[File:AmazonBooks10Crittercostuming.jpeg]]
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MATERIAL FOR POSTERITY: Before everyone crucifies me for encouraging the deforestation of the planet through copious Xeroxing, please let me tell you about another endangered resource: research material itself. It is an unfortunate fact that nearly all paper made and used for books and magazines from about 1820-1990 was acid based paper. This means nearly every book, newspaper and magazine produced during that time is on paper that ultimately self destructs, like a time bomb. The libraries of the world are in a crisis over what is to be done to save these resources. To save the information on this paper requires highly expensive de-acidification or moderately expensive copying, or comparatively inexpensive microfilming. The simple economics of library funding means that libraries will mostly use microfilm, (which is troublesome for costumers), as well as have to pick and choose which books and magazines are "important" enough to go to the expense of copying. I need hardly tell you where items like Turn of the Century
  
[[File:AmazonOtherFiskars7929.jpg]] Lorraine's Favorite
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[[History100pages1893to1898cuttersguide|sally_jacobs@pleasantco.comCallie@writepage.com  nul@aol.comSAVING tailoring]] and
  
Millinery
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[[BooksLowenhatsContents| millinery]] manuals will rate in this lifeboat situation. Therefore, for the good of future costumers, including one's self, we each need to notice when books like this are on the shelf of our local library falling apart. A book that is coming apart is a book whose days are numbered, soon to be thrown out. In the case of some pre 1910 catalogs, and drafting and sewing manuals, you may be looking at the last one of it's kind. The libraries can't afford to save all of them, so, you need to grab these books, before they are gone, plain paper copy them onto an acid free paper like Copysource, and bind up the copies, so they can replace the originals. At present I'm trying to copy dozens of them into paperless online format so that many people can have them at once. If each of us does this with a few books, we will save these endangered resources, as well as quickly and cheaply expand our own private libraries of rare research works. Expanding your personal library also saves lots of time doing research.
  
[[254pagesProjectsPlacemathats|Placemat Hats]]
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THE
  
[[254pagesProjectsBaseballhat|Amazing uses for a Baseball Hat]]
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==NON-LAZY==
  
[[254pagesProjectsBuckrambandeau|Basic Bandeau of Buckram]]
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, LAZY MECHANIC: If all this time efficiency still seems like "cheating" to you, relax. Just because you can do your research in a rush, you needn't do so. In fact, if you are a research junkie like me, it just means you can get three or four times as much information in the same time as you used to do before. In terms of the costume and academic food chains, this is often the difference between having enough research material to feed your work on, or having all your work time eaten away by a research project.
  
[[254pagesProjectsEdwardianhat|Edwardian Hat]]
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Links:
  
[[254pagesProjectsCraftfelthat|Hat Made Using Craft Felt]]
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[http://patriot.net/~nachtanz/SReed/research.html|NON-LAZYResearch Tips] (for reenactors)
  
[[254pagesProjectsCraftfeltsculpt|Craft Felt Sculpture]]
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[http://patriot.net/~nachtanz/SReed/secsource.html|Evaluating Secondary Sources]
  
[[254pagesProjectsStrawbraidhat|Straw Braid Hat]]
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[http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/beginners/research.html|Good Research Techniques]
  
[[254pagesProjectsThermoplasthelmet|Thermoplastic Helmet ]]
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[[Advice1pagesInstantr|INSTANT RESEARCH PAPERS]]
  
[[254pagesProjectsThermoplasthelmet|Project]]
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==Product Links==
  
[[254pagesProjectsArmorfinish|Non Toxic Metal Finishes for Armor]]
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[http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0375750959/thecostumersmani|Guide to Performing Arts Programs : Profiles of over 600 Colleges, High Schools, and Summer Programs]
  
Wigs
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[http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0768904420/thecostumersmani|Peterson's Professional Degree Programs in the Visual & Performing Arts, 2001]
  
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[[File:AmazonBooks2Extrawork.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/189389908X/thecostumersmani| "Extra" Work for Brain Surgeons]] "Extra" Work for Brain Surgeons
  
[[254pagesProjectsJapanwigs|Witch Wig into Samurai Lady]]
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[[File:AmazonBooks2Costumesandscriptseliz.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0888642261/thecostumersmani| Costumes and Scripts in the Elizabethan Theatres]] Costumes and Scripts in the Elizabethan Theatres
  
[[254pagesProjectsExtentionshairrolls|Extensions & Hair Rolls]]
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[[File:AmazonBooksWhattheydontteachyouatfilmschool.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786884770/thecostumersmani| What They Don't Teach You at Film School : 161 Strategies to Making Your Own Movie No Matter What]] What They Don't Teach You at Film School : 161 Strategies to Making Your Own Movie No Matter What
  
[[254pagesProjects18thwigs|Making your Own 18th Century Men's Wigs]]
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[http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/6305131104/thecostumersmani|Man With the Movie Camera]
  
[[254pagesProjectsChemotherapyrhat|Chemotherapy Patient Hats]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Sourcebookintheatricalhist.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486205150/thecostumersmani| A Source Book in Theatrical History]] A Source Book in Theatrical History
  
Fabric Modification
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Thepropbuildersmolding.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1558701281/thecostumersmani| The Prop Builder's Molding & Casting Handbook]]  The Prop Builder's Molding & Casting Handbook
  
[[254pagesProjectsFortunyfake2|Fortuny Style Pleating]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Theatricaldesignandproduction.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0767411919/thecostumersmani| Theatrical Design and Production : An Introduction to Scene Design and Construction, Lighting, Sound, Costume, and Makeup]] Theatrical Design and Production : An Introduction to Scene Design and Construction, Lighting, Sound, Costume, and Makeup
  
Foam crafts
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Theitaliancomedy.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486216799/thecostumersmani| The Italian Comedy : The Improvisation, Scenarios, Lives, Atrod. by Fred Eggan. by William A. Glaser and David L. Sills. J. G. Crowther.]]  The Italian Comedy : The Improvisation, Scenarios, Lives, Atrod. by Fred Eggan. by William A. Glaser and David L. Sills. J. G. Crowther.
  
[[254pagesProjectsAirball|Airball Sculpture]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Femaleplaywrightsftherestoration.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0460874276/thecostumersmani| Female Playwrights of the Restoration: Five Comedies (Everyman]] Female Playwrights of the Restoration: Five Comedies (Everyman
  
[[254pagesProjectsFoamheadpiece|Simple Foam Headpiece]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Thesecretlifeofaphra.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0813524555/thecostumersmani| The Secret Life of Aphra Behn]] The Secret Life of Aphra Behn
  
[[254pagesProjectsFoamheadpiece2|Complex Foam Headpiece]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Ahistoryoftheminstrelshow.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0939479214/thecostumersmani| A History of the Minstrel Show]] A History of the Minstrel Show
  
[[254pagesProjectsBirdfoot|Animal/Bird Foot Shoe]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Resistanceparodyanddouble.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312173636/thecostumersmani| Resistance, Parody, and Double Consciousness in African American Theatre, 1895-1910]] Resistance, Parody, and Double Consciousness in African American Theatre, 1895-1910
  
Other Crafts Projects
+
[[File:AmazonBooks9Charactercostumefiguredraw.jpeg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0240805348/thecostumersmani| Character Costume Figure Drawing : Step-by-Step Drawing Methods for Theatre Costume Designers]]  Character Costume Figure Drawing : Step-by-Step Drawing Methods for Theatre Costume Designers
  
[[254pagesProjectsPlasterbreastplate|Plaster Bandage Breastplate]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks9Costumedesign.jpeg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0155083791/thecostumersmani| Costume Design]] Costume Design
  
[[254pagesProjectsGeta|Make your own Geta (Japanese wooden shoes) Project]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks9Fashiondesigndrawingcourse.jpeg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0764124730/thecostumersmani| Fashion Design Drawing Course]] Fashion Design Drawing Course
  
[[254pagesProjectsFans|Copying Period Fans]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks9Fashiondesign.jpeg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0823016382/thecostumersmani| Fashion Design]] Fashion Design
  
[[254pagesProjectsSamplejewelryfinish|Sample Sheet of Antiqued Jewelry Finishes]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks9Drawfashmodels.jpeg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0891348964/thecostumersmani| Draw Fashion Models! (Discover Drawing)]] Draw Fashion Models! (Discover Drawing)
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualCostpropsindex|Costume Properties Construction Handbook]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks9Fashrendwcolor.jpeg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0130144606/thecostumersmani| Fashion Rendering with Color]] Fashion Rendering with Color
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk1|Chapter 1 Creating Non-Toxic Metal Jewelry Finishes]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Theroverandotherplays.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192822489/thecostumersmani| The Rover and Other Plays (The World's Classics)]] The Rover and Other Plays (The World's Classics)
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk2|Chapter 2 A Muslin Mache Mask]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Sexualviolence.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312219768/thecostumersmani| Sexual Violence on the Jacobean Stage]] Sexual Violence on the Jacobean Stage
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk3|Chapter 3 Quick Latex Nose (Positive Mold)]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Stagingreform.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0801433037/thecostumersmani| Staging Reform, Reforming the Stage : Protestantism and Popular Theater in Early Modern England]] Staging Reform, Reforming the Stage : Protestantism and Popular Theater in Early Modern England
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk4|Chapter 4 Detailed Latex Mask (Negative Mold)]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Stagingthejew.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0813524148/thecostumersmani| Staging the Jew : The Performance of an American Ethnicity, 1860-1920]] Staging the Jew : The Performance of an American Ethnicity, 1860-1920
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk5|Chapter 5 Flexible Paint on Latex]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooksRussianandsoviettheatre.gif|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0500281955/thecostumersmani| Russian and Soviet Theatre: Tradition and the Avant-Garde]] Russian and Soviet Theatre: Tradition and the Avant-Garde
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk6|Chapter 6 Cast Acrylic Jewels]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Missjulie.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486272818/thecostumersmani| Miss Julie (Dover Thrift Editions)]] Miss Julie (Dover Thrift Editions)
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk7|Chapter 7 A Sculpted Foam Rabbit Head]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Ghosts.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486298523/thecostumersmani| Ghosts (Dover Thrift Editions)]] Ghosts (Dover Thrift Editions)
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk8|Chapter 8 1910 Lady's Hat of Buckram]]
+
[[File:AmazonVideo2Wmshakromeojuliet.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/6305364613/thecostumersmani| William Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet]] William Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk9|Chapter 9 A Shop-Made Edwardian Hat Pin]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Anenemyofthepeople.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486406571/thecostumersmani| An Enemy of the People (Dover Thrift Editions)]] An Enemy of the People (Dover Thrift Editions)
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk10|Chapter 10 A Felt Hat Made from Craft Felt]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Unclevanya.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486401596/thecostumersmani| Uncle Vanya (Dover Thrift Editions)]] Uncle Vanya (Dover Thrift Editions)
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk11|Chapter 11 Celastic Greaves]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Thethreesisters.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486275442/thecostumersmani| The Three Sisters (Dover Thrift Editions) [UNABRIDGED]]] The Three Sisters (Dover Thrift Editions) [UNABRIDGED]
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk12|Chapter 12 Shop-Made Corset Bones]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Seagull.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486406563/thecostumersmani| Sea Gull (Dover Thrift Editions)]] Sea Gull (Dover Thrift Editions)
  
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk13|Chapter 13 Hexalite Helmet (now called Veraform)]]
+
[[File:AmazonBooks2Theemperorjones.jpg|link=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486292681/thecostumersmani| The Emperor Jones (Dover Thrift Editions)]]  The Emperor Jones (Dover Thrift Editions)
 
+
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk14|Chapter 14 Non Toxic Metal Finishes for Armor]]
+
 
+
[[AdviceCostcraftsmanualTmpjk15|Chapter 15 Distressing a Standard Man's Shirt]]
+
 
+
[http://www.knowledgehound.com/topics/costumes.htm|Costume Patterns, Tips: Make-up, masks, historical, fantasy, foreign...]
+
 
+
[http://upstagereview.org/Costumesarts.html|TOAS - Costuming Articles] (LOTS of good how-to info)
+
 
+
[http://www.techshop.ws/index.html|TechShop is the SF Bay Area's Only Open-Access Public Workshop -- What Do You Want To Make at TechShop?]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=86F06CF223AFF807|YouTube - Playlist - How-to Costume & Makeup ]
+
 
+
Making a contract for custom sewing work? Good guidelines at
+
 
+
[http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/textiles/cc393.htm|Custom Sewing Licenses and Regulations in Nebraska, CC393]
+
 
+
[http://www.simplicity.com/index.cfm?page=section/classroom/sewprojects/EraBonnet/eraBonnet.cfm|Simplicity - How to Make a Regency Era Bonnet ]
+
 
+
[[ManifestoAdvicePattern_links#Charts|More than you'll ever want to know about measurements, size conversion tables, and choosing pattern sizes.]]
+
 
+
[http://sca-garb.freeservers.com/articles/larger.html|Costuming For Larger Figures]
+
 
+
[http://costumegoddess.com/cgtips.htm|Costume Goddess How-To Tips]
+
 
+
[http://www.threadbanger.com/episode/iST_20080826|How to make Steampunk Goggles, Threadbanger | ThreadBanger]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cqXKwKJQBM|YouTube - SteamPunk Goggles for Less then $10: Threadbanger Crossover]
+
 
+
[http://makerfaire.com/|makerfaire.com Maker Faire]
+
 
+
[http://www.craftzine.com/|craftzine.com CRAFT The first project-based magazine dedicated to the renaissance in the world of crafts.]
+
 
+
[http://www.costumebeginner.com/|Beginner Costuming]
+
 
+
[http://www.craftytips.com/|Crafty Tips Arts & Crafts Directory ]
+
 
+
[http://farlandart.us/gabriel/| Gabriel - site showing a costume for the angel Gabriel, with process pictures of chain mail, wing and wig construction]
+
 
+
[http://tutuinfo.com/|How to Make a Tutu for Ballet or a Halloween Costume Tutu]
+
 
+
[http://www.creativity-portal.com/|Creativity-Portal.com - Learn for free - Explore Arts, Crafts, Music, Writing & Creativity]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzSQWSwUyD8|YouTube - How to make a Fat Suit!]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7z51JVYqphQ&NR=1|YouTube - Build Samurai Armor! Become an ancient warrior the indie way]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1WK26NHx0o&NR=1|YouTube - Halo Armor, Master Chief DIY : BFX : Build]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60mMzFeat_I&feature=channel|YouTube - Gatling Gun Arm Costume : BFX]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6GeSBHNrbk&feature=channel|YouTube - Halloween Bigfoot Costume : BFX : Build]
+
 
+
[http://craftzine.com/|craftzine.com CRAFT The first project-based magazine dedicated to the renaissance in the world of crafts.]
+
 
+
[http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~loebinfo/loebinfo/CostumeShopFAQ.htm|Costume Shop FAQ- American Repertory Theater Costume Shop]
+
 
+
[http://www.knowledgehound.com/topics/costumes.htm|Costume Patterns, Tips - Instructions, make-up, masks, accessories...]
+
 
+
[http://www.thecostumeworkshop.com/|Google Directory - Recreation > Parties > Costumes > ConstructionThe Costume Workshop Featuring Books, Videos and Costume Designs]
+
 
+
[http://naughtyteaspoon.20m.com/HOWTO.html|HOW-TO: Knitting, Sewing, Lace making, Ribbon work, Tatting and Crochet patterns and instruction]
+
 
+
[http://ask.metafilter.com/60319/How-do-I-make-fake-icicle-wings-for-a-costume|How do I make fake icicle wings for a costume Ask Metafilter]
+
 
+
[http://www.makezine.com/|makezine.com MAKE Technology on Your Time]
+
 
+
[http://www.craftytips.com/placemats/|Placemats « Crafty Tips & Crafty Websites  Great Crafting Tips and Websites]
+
 
+
[http://www.readymademag.com/blog/2006/10/12/gross-anatomy/|ReadyMade Blog » Blog Archive » Gross Anatomy]
+
 
+
[http://home.eol.ca/~props/index.html|PROPTOLOGY: The Journal of Props Professionals]
+
 
+
[http://www.theatrecrafts.com/index.shtml|www.theatrecrafts.com]
+
 
+
[http://www.texnet.it/tessile/traduz/|Textile dictionary] and automatic translator for any combination of English, French, Italian or German!
+
 
+
[http://www.cockeyed.com/incredible/incredible.html|Cockeyed.com Incredible Stuff - Hot Glue and Super 77]
+
 
+
[http://www.cockeyed.com/incredible/california/california1.html|Cockeyed Presents: Incredible Stuff - California (Map of the State) Costume Part 1]
+
 
+
[http://www.cockeyed.com/incredible/wings/wings.html|Cockeyed Presents: Incredible Stuff - Giant Costume Wings]
+
 
+
[http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/Dunes/1095/|Tigermeep!'s place: Info on Mascot creation, period costuming & theatrical makeup]
+
 
+
[[File:AmazonBooksCostumeconstruction.gif]]
+
 
+
[[Store100pagesBookhow_to|Recommended How-To Books]]
+
 
+
[http://www.marthastewart.com/|marthastewart.com]
+
 
+
[http://vintagesewing.info/1950s/50-hmg/hmg-toc.html|1950—How to Make Gloves—Table of Contents]
+
 
+
[http://www.byu.edu/tma/arts-ed/units/costcons.htm|Classroom Outline for Lessons in Costume Construction]
+
 
+
Harvard Law Legal Brief on
+
 
+
[http://leda.law.harvard.edu/leda/data/36/MAGDO.html|The copying of fashion design originals – “knocking off”]
+
 
+
[http://www.thelarper.org/issue_winter_2003/toc.html|The LARPer]
+
 
+
[http://www.rindo.com/105/kimono/index.html|JAPANESE KIMONO History and How-to info with animations of Obi tieing]
+
 
+
[http://www.rindo.com/105/kimono/data/howto/musubi.html|How to tie the Obi by use of gif animation]
+
 
+
[http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/tipscosplay.html|Sarcasm-hime's (very small) Cosplay Page: Tips, Tricks and Useful Sites]
+
 
+
[http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/hakamapattern.html|How to make a Hakama at Sarcasm-hime's (very small) Cosplay Page]
+
 
+
[http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/obi.html|How To Tie An Obi at Sarcasm-hime's (very small) Cosplay Page]
+
 
+
[http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/plastics.html|A Thermoplastics Primer at Sarcasm-hime's (very small) Cosplay Page]
+
 
+
[http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/wearingwigs.html|Wearing Wigs (for long-haired people) at Sarcasm-hime's (very small) Cosplay Page]
+
 
+
[http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/makingswords.html|Making Prop Swords at Sarcasm-hime's (very small) Cosplay Page]
+
 
+
[http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/mascots.html|Tips for Building Mascots at Sarcasm-hime's Cosplay Page]
+
 
+
[http://ecotheater.wordpress.com/2008/04/26/green-theater-how-to-costumes/|Green Theater: How-To: Costumes « ecoTheater]
+
 
+
[http://etsylabs.blogspot.com/2007/03/dress-form-tutorial-want-to-make-exact.html|Etsy Labs: Dress Form Tutorial: Want to make an exact replica of your body for custom work?]
+
 
+
Building Costume Equipment
+
 
+
[http://www.leanna.com/DuctTapeDouble/|Duct Tape Double] (custom dress form)
+
 
+
[http://www.leanna.com/DuctTapeDouble/textA.html|Freebie Instructions]
+
 
+
[http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00002.asp|Clone Yourself A Fitting Assistant]
+
 
+
[http://www.alleycatscratch.com/lotr/makingem/DuctDummy.htm|Duct Tape Dummy]
+
 
+
[http://www.alleycatscratch.com/lotr/makingem/DuctDummy.htm|Duct Tape Dummy]
+
 
+
[http://www.build-stuff.com/|Workshop Publishing - Plans, Books, Videos - Home Page]
+
 
+
[http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00004S9MN/thecostumersmani|Amazon.com: buying info: Wood Plans IFS-#1013 Sewing Center Cabinet]
+
 
+
[[File:h.t| Dream Sewing Spaces : Design & Organization for Spaces Large & Small]]
+
 
+
[http://sewing.about.com/library/weekly/aa070897.htm|Sew A Craft Tool And Paint Brush Holder]
+
 
+
[http://sewing.about.com/library/weekly/aa122898.htm|Make your Own Thread Racks]
+
 
+
[http://sewing.about.com/topicsubsewroom.htm|Sewing Rooms and Sewing Helpers]
+
 
+
[http://www.tollefsondesigns.com/costumes/garmentbag1.html|Kristina Tollefson - Accessory Bag Project]
+
 
+
[http://www.tollefsondesigns.com/costumes/handbook.html|Kristina Tollefson - Shopping Handbook Project]
+
 
+
[http://sewing.about.com/topicsubmachine.htm|Sewing Machines]
+
 
+
How To Draw Costumes
+
 
+
See
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesRenderinglinks|Costume Rendering Tips and Links]]
+
 
+
More online info about:
+
 
+
[http://www.devi.net/saribook.html|Saris: an Illustrated guide to the Indian Art of Draping]
+
 
+
Sewing and Needlework
+
 
+
[http://www.cwu.edu/~robinsos/ppages/resources/costxt/costxt_index.htm|Online Book on Costume Sewing - Table of Contents by Ms. Leslie Robison-Greene, UoL, and Scott R. Robinson Costume Designer CWU]
+
 
+
[http://www.maskon.com/kerry/kerry6.htm|Sew-Your-Own Lycra Bodysuit]
+
 
+
[http://nav.webring.com/cgi-bin/navcgi?ring=beadingring;list|The Beading Ring]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=70BFDFACDAB73C72|YouTube - Playlist - Sewing Tutorials ]
+
 
+
[http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00007.asp|Bias 101]
+
 
+
[http://www.fabrics.net/wisdom.asp|Fabric Articles and Columns on Cleaning, Sewing, Trends, Tips, Projects]
+
 
+
[http://www.glove.org/|How to make Gloves]
+
 
+
[http://members.tripod.com/~perfectpatterns/frogs.html|Making Frogs and Ball buttons]
+
 
+
[http://www.9v.com/crystal/kerij-e/docs/knots.htm|Knot Buttons and Frog Fasteners]
+
 
+
[http://www.baltazor.com/|Heirloom Sewing, Smocking and Bridal at Baltazor Fabrics & Laces]
+
 
+
[http://www.earthlydelights.com.au/Irish7.html|How to Make Your Own Irish Dance Costume]
+
 
+
[http://www.darkleather.com/|Sam's DarkLeather.com --Home]
+
 
+
[http://www.darkleather.com/instructions.htm|Sam's DarkLeather -Instructions for making an Underbust Corset and Celtic Knotwork]
+
 
+
[http://www.lyonslpgas.com/sewscape/costume.html|Costume Sewing Resources]
+
 
+
[http://www.loudzen.com/users/jessica/precostuming/fabric.html|Understanding Fabric]
+
 
+
[[File:h.t| You Can Make It - Learn To Sew - Level 1 (1995)]]
+
 
+
[http://www.sewing.org/|Welcome to the Home Sewing Association]
+
 
+
[http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00150.asp|How to Measure Up]
+
 
+
[http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00004.asp|Choose the Correct Pattern Size]
+
 
+
[http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00005.asp|Cutting Out]
+
 
+
[http://www.zilltech.com/FAQCostumeConst.html|Aziza Sa'id's FAQ - Costume Construction ]
+
 
+
[http://www.forest.gen.nz/Medieval/articles/Tunics/TUNICS.HTML|'T-tunic' - the period way] (Medieval)
+
 
+
[http://www.pipcom.com/~tempus/tempus/index.html|Tempus Peregrinator's Weeb Page]
+
 
+
[http://www.pipcom.com/~tempus/sewing/index.html|Tempus' Sewing & Garb Accessories Site]
+
 
+
[http://www.vertetsable.com/demos_patterndraft.htm|Recreating 16th and 17th Century Clothing: Drafting a Basic Block Pattern]
+
 
+
[http://www.knowledgehound.com/khhow2s/matrix_costumes.htm|Make A Matrix Costume - Neo, Trinity, Morpheus, Agent Smith...]
+
 
+
[http://www.hiraeth.com/ytg/projects/space-age/waistcoat.htm|Young Embroiderers project - Plastic Space-Age Vest]
+
 
+
[http://www.sewingwitch.com/sewing/sewhot.html|Ken's New Sewing Links]
+
 
+
[http://patternsthatfityou.com/freeclasses.htm|Patterns That Fit You - FreeClasses]
+
 
+
[http://craftandfabriclinks.com/learn.html|Craft And Fabric Links: Learn To Sew]
+
 
+
[http://www.patternshowcase.com/mall/stores_app/store.asp?Store_id=124|My Sewing Classes]
+
 
+
[http://vintagesewing.info/1930s/36-hsc/hsc-toc-long.html|VintageSewing.info—1936, Home Sewing Course—Table of Contents (long)]
+
 
+
[http://www.sewnet.com/|SewNet, 515-451-9531]
+
 
+
[http://www.loudzen.com/users/jessica/precostuming/jargon.html|Sewing Jargon and Technique]
+
 
+
[http://dept.kent.edu/museum/exhibit/kleibacker/kleibacker2.htm|Charles Kleibacker: Master of the Bias]
+
 
+
[http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/textiles/nf424.htm|Sewing with Velvet, NF00-424]
+
 
+
[http://www.creativeneedlemag.com/newdloads/velvetsewingjul88/velvet.html|The Art & Technique of Sewing Velvet]
+
 
+
[http://www.lubbockmetro.com/sewnsew/work11.html|Peggy's Sewing Workshop: Satin Secrets, Microfiber Soft Suedes]
+
 
+
[http://www.geocities.com/FashionAvenue/1184/sewing.html|Sewing Sheers]
+
 
+
[http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/textiles/nf431.htm|Sewing with Voile, NF00-431]
+
 
+
[http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/textiles/cc393.htm|Custom Sewing Licenses and Regulations in Nebraska, CC393]
+
 
+
[http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/textiles/g1091.htm|Sewing With Knit Fabric; G92-1091-A]
+
 
+
[http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/textiles/index.htm|Cooperative Extension Catalog of Publications--Textiles, Clothing & Design]
+
 
+
[http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/textiles/nf250.htm|What You Ought To Know About Sewing Machine Needles, NF 96-250]
+
 
+
[http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/textiles/g1028.htm|Preparing Fabric for Use; G91-1028]
+
 
+
[http://www.scottishwinters.com/filmdocs/fbdcostume1.html|Ali Baba (Belly Dance) Costuming Secrets Revealed (Video how-to)]
+
 
+
[http://www.tias.com/stores/relics/|Sewing Machine Manuals for sale in Downloadable Format]
+
 
+
[http://www.sewingweb.com/links/|Sewing Web - Sewing Resources on the Web]
+
 
+
[http://sewing.about.com/library/weekly/aa102100a.htm|Is There a Difference In Threads? You Be The Judge!]
+
 
+
[http://www.directcon.net/wander/tips.htm|Costume Tips and Tricks by One Tough Costumer]
+
 
+
[http://www.geocities.com/WestHollywood/Heights/3204/1home.html|StitchBoy Home (Free Patterns and sewing instructions for all 8 styles of men's stretch swim trunks)]
+
 
+
[http://sewing.about.com/hobbies/sewing/library/lessons/bllessonindex.htm|Sewing Lesson Index]
+
 
+
[http://www.leanna.com/|Leanna Studios]
+
 
+
[http://www.sewnet.com/|SewNet, 515-451-9531]
+
 
+
[http://www.lilyabello.com/sewdir.htm|Lily Abello's Sewing Resource Guide]
+
 
+
[http://www.farthingales.on.ca/crinbraid.htm|The Application of Horsehair Braid (crin trim) to Hemlines]
+
 
+
[http://www.100megspop3.com/waistedminds/aris.html|Duct Tape Method of making A Renaissance Bodice Pattern]
+
 
+
[http://www.roundtwocostumes.com/ducttape.htm|Round Two Costumes - Duct Tape Patterns]
+
 
+
[http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wittie/sca/garb.html|Aíbell ingen Dairmata, Garb]
+
 
+
[http://home.clara.net/arianrhod/Aldebaran/DoItYourself/Cloak02.html|Cloak Making Guide - The Semi-Circular Pattern.]
+
 
+
[http://amtgard.com:8080/howto.html|On-line: Publications - Howto's]
+
 
+
[http://amtgard.com:8080/how2clok.pdf|How To Make a Quick and Easy Cloak]
+
 
+
[http://amtgard.com:8080/how2toph.pdf|How To Make a Quick and Easy Top Hat]
+
 
+
[http://amtgard.com:8080/how2head.pdf|How To Make a Quick and Easy Monster Head]
+
 
+
[http://amtgard.com:8080/how2hat.pdf|How To Make a Quick and Easy Guido (Large Beret)]
+
 
+
[http://amtgard.com:8080/how2jhat1.pdf|How To Make a Quick and Easy Jester Hat]
+
 
+
[http://amtgard.com:8080/how2tunic.pdf|How To Make a Quick and Easy Tabard and Tunic]
+
 
+
Unusual Materials & Plastics
+
 
+
See also
+
 
+
[[History100pagesWearablecomputing|Links on Wearable Computing, ]]
+
 
+
[[History100pagesWearablecomputing|Smart Fabrics and Electronic Clothing]]
+
 
+
[http://www.marthastewart.com|Martha Stewart: Crepe Paper Costumes]
+
 
+
[http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Fetish_Sewing|Yahoo! Groups : Fetish_Sewing]
+
 
+
[http://www.billpalmer.com/collar.htm|How to make a wing tip collar out of a Clorox bottle]
+
 
+
[http://www.thistothat.com/|This to That (Glue Advice)]
+
 
+
[http://www.tapplastics.com/info/video.php|Instructional Videos: TAP Plastics]
+
 
+
[http://www.geocities.com/cbking43/index.html|Cardboard King Set Designs on a Budget]
+
 
+
[http://www.littleboxofbones.com/costumes/vacuumtable/|Littleboxofbones - The Vacuum Table Page]
+
 
+
[[File:h.t| The Foam Book : An Easy Guide to Building Polyfoam Puppets]]
+
 
+
[http://www.instructables.com/id/Moldmaking-With-Clear-Silicone-Rubber/|Moldmaking With Clear Silicone Rubber - Instructables - DIY, How To, craft, art]
+
 
+
[http://www.instructables.com/id/Replicating-body-parts-in-plaster/|Replicating body parts in plaster - Instructables - DIY, How To, craft, art]
+
 
+
[http://www.halloweenfear.com/vacuumformintro.html|Ralis Kahn's Vacuum Form Table Plans]
+
 
+
[http://www.sciplus.com|American Science & Surplus]
+
 
+
[http://www.neonstring.com/|NeonString EL Wire & Drivers - Electroluminescent Wire, aka el wire, glowstring, inverters]
+
 
+
[http://www.opusframing.com/library/howto.html|Opus Framing and Art Supplies - How to Library]
+
 
+
[http://www.opusframing.com/library/pdf/2part_mold.pdf|2 Part Plaster Moldmaking (PDF)]
+
 
+
[http://www.build-stuff.com/|Workshop Publishing - Plans, Books, Videos - Home Page]
+
 
+
[http://www.studiocreations.com/howto/|DH2 - How-to Costume and Prop Building] (Star Wars, Star Trek & other movie costumes)
+
 
+
[http://www.mikethealchemist.com/moldmaking.html|Resin Casting and Mold Making/The Alchemy Works]
+
 
+
[http://www.hirstarts.com/moldmake/moldmaking.html#spike|Hirst Arts Mold Making Page]
+
 
+
[http://www.modeltrain.com/rubbermold/rubbermold.html|Latex mold making]
+
 
+
[http://www.dwave.net/~dconrad/foamcutter/foamcutter.html|Build a Foamcutter]
+
 
+
[http://www.artmolds.com/index.cfm?u_cat=28|Latex Mold Rubber]
+
 
+
[http://www.geocities.com/stalker217/ghillie/|How to make a Ghillie Suit (the best instructions on the net!)]
+
 
+
[http://www.hobbycast.net/video.htm|HobbyCast - Casting Resin, Silicone Rubber, Moldmaking Materials]
+
 
+
[http://www.bioweapons.com/Costuming.htm|Bio-Armor Construction Area: How to make Cast Body Armor, step by step]
+
 
+
[http://p082.ezboard.com/bpropreplicas|Construction Info and Posts on making Star Wars and other Movie Prop replicas]
+
 
+
[http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/plastics.html|A Thermoplastics Primer at Sarcasm-hime's (very small) Cosplay Page]
+
 
+
[http://www.ireadh.demon.co.uk/costumes/index.htm|Maggie & Mike Percival's Costume Library] (with tips on wing making!)
+
 
+
[http://www.ireadh.demon.co.uk/costumes/Elwing/index.html|Elwings Wings]
+
 
+
[http://members.aol.com/sblades/maile.html|Animated Guide to Making Chainmail]
+
 
+
[http://www.studiocreations.com/howto/vacuumforming/index.html|Vacuumforming Plastic]
+
 
+
[http://www.studiocreations.com/howto/vacuumtable/index.html|Building a Vacuumform Table]
+
 
+
[http://www.neonstring.com/How_to_solder_EL_Wire/How_to_Solder_EL_Wire.html|How to Solder EL Wire]
+
 
+
[http://entropyhouse.com/penwiper/costumes/helmsdeep.html|Craft Foam Armor Tutorial]
+
 
+
[http://www.jedielfqueen.com/index.htm|The Realm of the Jedielfqueen (Tutorials on craft foam armor, fabric paint embroidery, templates, and many things for making LOTR and Star Wars fan costumes)]
+
 
+
[http://amethyst-angel.com/armormaking.html|Armormaking 101 - Main Page (Craft Foam sheet and Polystyrene sheet armor)]
+
 
+
[http://www.bioweapons.com/|BioWeapons.com Guyver BioArmor (Cast Armor) Construction Site]
+
 
+
[http://www.studiocreations.com/|Studio Creations: (How to info for making Vacuuform armor) ]
+
 
+
[http://amethyst-angel.com/prop/armor.html|AA's Prop Armor]
+
 
+
[http://amethyst-angel.com/propcloset.html|Amethyst's Walk-in Prop Closet]
+
 
+
[http://www.alleycatscratch.com/lotr/Armor/Cheat/FunFoam.htm|Fun Foam]
+
 
+
[http://www.hot-lead.org/Samcostume/SamOrcArmor.htm|Sam - Orc Armor (Making LOTR fan armor from leather and craft foam)]
+
 
+
[http://www.daniellesplace.com/html/bible_themes_armorofgod.html|Armor of God]
+
 
+
[http://darkvictory.com/|Dark Victory Armory]
+
 
+
[http://www.warmplastic.com/|warmplastic.com Vacuum Forming]
+
 
+
[http://triggur.org/costume/|Kevin's Costuming Work]
+
 
+
[http://triggur.org/costume/mech/|Giant Robot Costume]
+
 
+
[http://triggur.org/costume/neon/|Neon Man / Neon Anubis]
+
 
+
[http://www.studiocreations.com/howto/index.html|FAIRBANKS NON-TOXIC CRAFTS COOKBOOKDH2 - Definitive How To make Star Wars Costumes (Vacuuform)]
+
 
+
[[File:h.t| The Complete Guide to Glues and Adhesives]]
+
 
+
[http://home.eol.ca/~props/papier.html|PROPTOLOGY:Papier Mache Rediscovered]
+
 
+
[http://home.eol.ca/~props/breakdown.html|PROPTOLOGY: Breakdown and Distressing]
+
 
+
[http://home.eol.ca/~props/metall.htm|metallic surfaces]
+
 
+
[http://www.schenz.com/fm_celastic.html|How to Work with Celastic]
+
 
+
[http://www.oozinggoo.com/howto.html|How to Make Lava Lamps - Oozing Goo]
+
 
+
Patterns
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesPattern_links|The Omnigarment Convertible Multi-use CostumeCostume Pattern Links]]
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesPattern_links| Online]]
+
 
+
Makeup
+
 
+
Many more links on the
+
 
+
[[History100pagesMasksand|Makeup Page]]
+
 
+
Hats
+
 
+
[http://www.casfs.org/connote/columns/costuming101/6_2/index.html|Costuming 101-Making a 14th Century Hood]
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesAdvice14|How do I make a big showgirl-type headdress?]]
+
 
+
[[History100pagesHats#How To|More How To make Hat Links]]
+
 
+
[http://www.paonline.com/mikehoov/Special_Features/Turban/Constructing_The_Perfect_Turban.htm|Constructing The Perfect Turban (Sikh)]
+
 
+
[http://www.akalsangat.com/iw2.html|Akal Sangat (Sikh Turban)]
+
 
+
[http://www.davina.org/turban/sample2.html|Tyeing a Turban (Belly Dance)]
+
 
+
[http://www.anyiams.com/wrapping.htm|Anyiams Creation: Headwrapping Step-by-Step (African)]
+
 
+
Hair & Wigs
+
 
+
[http://www.psysheep.com/|P s y c h e d e l i c S h e e p: Crazy hair from crazy bitches]
+
 
+
[http://www.wigs4you.com/wig_advice.htm|The Wig Advice Page]
+
 
+
[http://www.notjustwigs.com/wigcare_articles.cfm|NotJustWigs.com How to Style a Wig]
+
 
+
[http://cornrows.co.uk/|Cornrows.co.uk]
+
 
+
[http://quinnster.co.uk/hair/|Quinnster's Token Pages (All about Hair Extensions)]
+
 
+
[http://www.transformation.co.uk/gwigs.html|Transvestite Transformation - a guide to wigs]
+
 
+
[[1848-491849hairdosIndex|Hair Dressing Instructions 1849]]
+
 
+
[http://www.theshed.co.uk/elviswig.html|Knitted Elvis Wig Pattern]
+
 
+
More
+
 
+
[[History100pagesAccesslinks#Hair and Wigs:|Hair and Wig How To- & Info]]
+
 
+
Where to find Supplies
+
 
+
[[Store100pagesSupplies|Costume Supplies]]
+
 
+
[http://www.lyonslpgas.com/sewscape/costume.html|Costume Sewing Resources]
+
 
+
[http://www.frugalfun.com/costumewhouse.html|Touring a Professional Theatre Company Costume Warehouse]
+
 
+
Cleaning and care
+
 
+
[http://reenactment.about.com/hobbies/reenactment/library/weekly/aa21499.htm|Clothing Care - Historical Reenactment - 2/14/99]
+
 
+
[http://www.chemistry.co.nz/stain_frame.htm|Stain Removal Guide]
+
 
+
[http://www.butlersguild.com/guests/general/stain_removal.html|Stain Removal]
+
 
+
[[File:h.t| Clean It Fast, Clean It Right : The Ultimate Guide to Making Absolutely Everything You Own Sparkle and Shine]]
+
 
+
[http://www.vintageconnection.net/|The Vintage Connection]
+
 
+
[http://www.vintageconnection.net/archives/PhotographingYourCollection.htm|Photographing Your Collection of Antique & Vintage Fashions]
+
 
+
[http://www.vintageconnection.net/archives/HowToCleanStoreDisplayAntiqueVintageFashions.htm|How To Clean, Store, & Display Antique & Vintage Fashions]
+
 
+
[http://www.vintageconnection.net/archives/CleaningAndStoringAntiqueVintageClothing.htm|Cleaning & Storing Antique & Vintage Clothing, Fashion]
+
 
+
[http://www.vintageconnection.net/archives/PesteredByPests.htm|If You're Pestered By Pests]
+
 
+
More info at
+
 
+
[[History100pagesMuseelnx#Information,|Museum Links]]
+
 
+
Tying, Pleating and Wrapping
+
 
+
[http://www.si.edu/nmafa/exhibits/kente/how4.htm|Wrapped in Pride - wrapping a Kente Cloth]
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesFortunyfake|Faking Fortuny "Delphos" Pleats]]
+
 
+
[http://www.alleycatscratch.com/lotr/makingem/Tips/CrushSilk.htm|Crushing Silk]
+
 
+
Computers
+
 
+
[[ComputerSevenstepsSevensteps|Seven Steps for Making a Costume Shop Web Page]]
+
 
+
[http://www.egroups.com/group/patternmakingsoftware|How to make your own web pageeGroups : patternmakingsoftware]
+
 
+
[http://www.myalbummaker.com/|My Album Maker]
+
 
+
[[Store100pagesAffiliateprograms|How to support the costs of hosting your costume site through affiliate programs]]
+
 
+
Painting, Dyeing & Distressing
+
 
+
[http://www.toreadors.com/gothfash/gothfash34.html|FAIRBANKS NON-TOXIC CRAFTS COOKBOOK3.4 how can i paint my leather jacket or shoes?]
+
 
+
[http://sewing.about.com/library/weekly/aa040599.htm|Color Copier Transfer Paper]
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesDyeing|Fabric Dyeing And Painting at UAF]]
+
 
+
Many more how to dye links on the
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesDyepaintlinks|Dye Page]]
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesDistressing|Reference Images for Costume Distressing]]
+
 
+
[http://www.studiocreations.com/howto/distressing/index.html|Distressing and Weathering Pages]
+
 
+
[http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=10173.0|I've figured out the best way to stencil EVER. A must read. (tutorial and pics)]
+
 
+
Education & Career Development
+
 
+
[http://craftycollege.com/academics/index.html|Arts and Crafts Classes at Crafty College]
+
 
+
[http://www.directcon.net/wander/cosbiz.htm|Tips for Starting a Costume Business]
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesJobdescription|What Do You do as a Costume Designer for a Living?]]
+
 
+
[http://www.artslynx.org/theatre/resumes.htm|Resume Design for the Theatre Designer - Theatre Resources from Artslynx]
+
 
+
[http://www.artslynx.org/theatre/ports.htm|Theatre Design Portfolios - Theatre Resources from Artslynx]
+
 
+
[http://www.artslynx.org/theatre/props2.htm|Props Timeline and Product Usage]
+
 
+
[http://www.artslynx.org/theatre/whodoeswhat.htm|Who does what in the theatre - Theatre Resources from Artslynx]
+
 
+
[http://www.artslynx.org/theatre/design.htm|Stage Design and Theatre TechnologTheatre Resources from Artslynx]
+
 
+
Jewelry
+
 
+
[http://www.signetring.com/Coronet/Coronet_how_to_make/coronet_how_to_make.htm|Coronet how to make]
+
 
+
[http://www.silversmithing.com/1photo.htm|Society of American Silversmiths - Photo Tips for Metalsmiths]
+
 
+
[http://www.signetring.com/index.htm|Carl Lemke Unique Jewelry: Heraldic Reproduction Jewelry]
+
 
+
[http://www.signetring.com/Coronet/Coronet_how_to_make/coronet_how_to_make.htm|Coronet how to make]
+
 
+
[http://www.signetring.com/Jewelry/Renaissance_Jewelry/Renaissance_Collar/Info_Page/Making_wax_seals/making_wax_seals.htm|Making wax seals]
+
 
+
Wings
+
 
+
[http://www.miniclan.org/eden/costumes/wings.html|Wing Tutorial]
+
 
+
[http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/Vines/5629/rulok/wings/default.htm|Rulok the Gargoyle - Wings]
+
 
+
[http://ask.metafilter.com/60319/How-do-I-make-fake-icicle-wings-for-a-costume|How do I make fake icicle wings for a costume Ask Metafilter]
+
 
+
[http://farlandart.us/gabriel/| Gabriel - site showing a costume for the angel Gabriel, with process pictures of chain mail, wing and wig construction]
+
 
+
[http://www.speakeasy.org/~traceyb/thrift/January/flights.html|Flights of Fancy--Wings]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrmmueERgA8|YouTube - Flapping Wing demo (no sound)]
+
 
+
[http://www.fursuit.org/faq/17wings.htm|Links to sites on making wings]
+
 
+
[http://www.simplicity.com/index.cfm?page=section/classroom/sewprojects/wings/wings.cfm|Simplicity - HOW TO MAKE WINGS]
+
 
+
[http://www.simplicity.com/index.cfm?page=section/classroom/sewprojects/wings/wings.cfm|Simplicity Patterns for Sewing Projects - Making Halloween Wings of wire]
+
 
+
[http://www.bact.org/iol_wings_2.html|Iolanthe wing construction]
+
 
+
[http://www.the-avariel.com/|The Avariel Site (Making Wings for costumes, forum, tips, etc.)]
+
 
+
[http://www.cockeyed.com/incredible/incredible.html|Cockeyed.com Incredible Stuff - Hot Glue and Super 77]
+
 
+
[http://www.cockeyed.com/incredible/wings/wings.html|Cockeyed Presents: Incredible Stuff - Giant Costume Wings]
+
 
+
Fursuits & Fake fur
+
 
+
[http://www.fursuit.co.uk/|Welcome to... Fursuit.co.uk!]
+
 
+
[http://www.fursuit.de/|The German Fursuit Page - Welcome]
+
 
+
[http://www.cikercostumes.com/|Ciker costumes - Mascots!]
+
 
+
[http://www.furry.org.au/|WWW.FURRY.ORG.AU is here!]
+
 
+
[http://V.webring.com/hub?ring=furring&id=671&list|WebRing: FurRing]
+
 
+
[[File:AmazonBooks10Crittercostuming.jpeg]]
+
 
+
[http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0967817072/thecostumersmani| Critter Costuming: Making Mascots and Fabricating Fursuits: Books: Adam Riggs]
+
 
+
[http://www.casamai.com/|Welcome to Casa Mai (home of costume and fursuit hobbysts)]
+
 
+
[http://www.instructables.com/id/realistic-werewolf-costume/|realistic werewolf costume - Instructables - DIY, How To, craft, art]
+
 
+
[http://www.mochi-mochi.org/workshop/crafting/index.html|Costume Crafting]
+
 
+
[http://www.nicodemus.org/fursuit.cgi|Nic's Fursuit Pages - Welcome to the Site]
+
 
+
[http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/fursuiterden|Yahoo! Clubs fursuiterden]
+
 
+
[http://www.tkqlhce.com/click-904740-10366165|Faux Fur Fabric]
+
 
+
[http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/fursuitingworkshop|Yahoo! Clubs fursuitingworkshop]
+
 
+
[http://dir.clubs.yahoo.com/Entertainment___Arts/Comics_and_Animation/Furries/|Yahoo! Clubs for Furries]
+
 
+
[http://fursuit.org/faq/|Fursuit FAQ]
+
 
+
[[File:h.t| The Foam Book : An Easy Guide to Building Polyfoam Puppets]]
+
 
+
[http://www.avians.net/legend/Fursuit.html|The Griffin Fursuit]
+
 
+
[http://www.costumers.com/mascots/index.html|Pierre's Mascots & Costumes]
+
 
+
Related Link:
+
 
+
[http://monstermakers.com/|The Monster Makers]
+
 
+
[http://furhappens.com/|Fur Happens . com - Custom Mascot and Costume Design]
+
 
+
[http://fursuit.org/|FURSUIT - The Furry Costume Information Exchange]
+
 
+
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fursuit|Fursuit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]
+
 
+
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTR5EkoJaOI&mode=related&search=|YouTube - Midwest FurFest 2006 Fursuit Parade]
+
 
+
Movie Fan Costumes
+
 
+
[http://home.earthlink.net/~cstaehle/lotrothercostume.html|Frodo Costume Details by Carolyn]
+
 
+
[http://www.alleycatscratch.com/lotr/|LOTR Costume Research Home]
+
 
+
[http://members.tripod.com/borgcrazy/id21.htm|Borg costume guide]
+
 
+
[http://www.startrekuniformguide.com/|Star Trek Uniform Guide]
+
 
+
[http://www.wilcoxusa.net/saber/|Build Your Own Light Saber - Main]
+
 
+
[http://www.studiocreations.com/howto/index.html|DH2 - Costume and Prop Building Star Wars Series]
+
 
+
[http://www.studiocreations.com/howto/evilash/main.html|Building An Evil Ash Costume]
+
 
+
[http://www.geocities.com/mrsmayimnaar/Jedi_Robes.html|Jedi_Robes.page]
+
 
+
[http://www.padawansguide.com/index.shtml|The Padawan's Guide to Star Wars Prequel Costuming]
+
 
+
[http://www.angelfire.com/movies/nobudgetsfx/starwars.html|Star Wars FX]
+
 
+
[http://kincharbamin.com/index.html|Kin-Char Bamin, Jedi Knight]
+
 
+
Many More Links like this may be found at my
+
 
+
[[Mwbh100pagesMwbh|Movie Pages: Men With Big Hair]]
+
 
+
'''
+
 
+
[[Store100pagesBookhow_to|Click here forCostume Pattern and How-to Books]]'''
+
 
+
Miscellaneous
+
 
+
[[Tara1pagesOtherpor|Portfolios on Dyeing, Cutting, Painting and Costume Crafts]]
+
 
+
[[AdviceDumpdecorDumpdecor|Dumpster Diver Decor]]
+
 
+
[[Advice1pagesHow_do_you_get_to_visit_a_study_|How do you get to visit a study collection of costumes in a museum?]]
+
 
+
[[Tara1pagesCostumefoodparty|Food Ideas for Costumer's Parties]]
+
 
+
[http://www.farthingales.on.ca/grommet_tips.htm|Basic Grommet Setting Tips]
+
 
+
[http://www.costumeplotdatabase.com/|Welcome to the Costume Plot Database!]
+
 
+
[http://www.usitt.org/sightlines/v48/n10/stories/CostumeDatabase.html|USITT Costume Storage Ideas and Images Database Waiting for Submissions]
+
 
+
[http://ccgi.firewyre.force9.co.uk/brassgoggles/|Brass Goggles- SteamPunk Links]
+
 
+
[http://ccgi.firewyre.force9.co.uk/brassgoggles/?page_id=133|Brass Goggles » How-To Costume Goggles]
+
 
+
[http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/nikolas.lloyd/models/models.html|LLOYDIAN MODELLING TIPS (Making models for miniature war scenes-good info for scenic model making and more)]
+
 
+
[http://www.flick.com/~liralen/quills/quills.html|How to Cut Quill Pens from Feathers]
+
 
+
[http://www.cast-shop.com/|Cast Shop - Supplying Casting Products To The UK And Beyond...]Making "casts" for stage
+
 
+
[http://www.concertjumpsuits.com/|CONCERT JUMPSUITS (Kits for making Elvis Impersonator suits)]
+
 
+
[http://www.theshed.co.uk/elviswig.html|Knitted Elvis Wig Pattern]
+
 
+
[http://home.eol.ca/~props/index.html#toc|PROPTOLOGY: The Journal of Props Professionals]
+
 
+
[http://www.celticdragonpress.com/|The Art of Kiltmaking - Celtic Dragon Press]
+
 
+
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Revision as of 23:54, 22 January 2014

The Costumer's Manifesto: Research Heresy

RESEARCH HERESY

RESEARCH

HERESY: As a high school student it was my ambition to become a librarian. As a result, my first paying job, as well as years of volunteer jobs and classes, were spent in libraries, working, studying their systems, and hiding out. This put me at a singular advantage all through college and grad school, and I was generally regarded by students and faculty alike as a sort of guru of library research. I could, and did, do major graduate research papers on obscure subjects in 3-7 days, start to finish, and get highest marks. So it was no greatsurprise to me when the faculty asked me to do a seminar on research for the assembled faculty and students in the department's weekly lecture series. The faculty sat down expecting I'd give a serious harangue to my fellow students encouraging them to stick their noses to the grindstone of the library, and the students braced to snooze through yet another "scholarly paper". I seemed to shock everybody, pleasantly or unpleasantly as the case may be, by actually explaining how I did my research. You see, because I understood the system, I understood how to "cheat" the system. So I explained that one could get information out of the library in bulk, in less time, without so much "nose to the grindstone." I was, I'm afraid, even flip about it. And I admitted that the recent research paper I wrote that was considered by the faculty to be "of publishable quality" on French Revolutionary Festivals, was in fact the product of one weekend's cramming. Well, the students didn't fall asleep, and my advisers were looking not at all happy with me, but, I thought: "I have a mission here---I must lead the righteous to the path of better grades, no matter what the cost!" So I did. And here is my lecture (with some new tricks I've learned since):

THE

LAZY

MECHANIC: First, to preface my system for doing library research, let me explain the story of the Lazy Mechanic and the Industrious Mechanic. According to my Dad, who comes from a line of machinists, engineers and other early technocrats, it's better for a factory to hire a lazy mechanic to service it's machines, than an industrious one. He says that an industrious mechanic will carefully oil, and service and repair a machine so that it works perfectly (with lots of his help and labor) and never needs replacing. This will leave you with an outdated and labor inefficient machine, that is in too good a repair to justify scrapping. A lazy mechanic, on the other hand, doesn't want to spend his day oiling and repairing and servicing. So he will use his mechanical knowledge to alter the machine to make it more efficient, (expending extra time at the beginning), so he needn't work on it for the future. He will also ignore doing any kind of servicing that isn't actually necessary to the operation of the machine. In short, he will expend his energy on making it a better machine, rather than maintaining an inefficient status quo. This is one of life's important lessons. If something takes a lot of time, trouble, and effort to do, when it is something that should be simple, chances are that the system is set up wrong. In this case you need to apply your effort to finding a better system that works faster, rather than simply dumping all your effort into forcing an inefficient method to work for you. This will take extra time at the beginning, and save you time in the long run.

RESEARCHLAZY

AmazonBooks4Petersonsprofesssionaldegreeprograms.jpg

AmazonVideo3Manwithamoviecamera.jpg (Classic Soviet film)

THE

PROBLEM

WITH THE SYSTEM: Doing research in the visual arts in a normal library is one of those inefficient systems that need fixing. There is a simple reason for this. Libraries are predominantly set up for books. Books are predominantly set up for the words in the books. Library systems therefore are based on the assumption that you are looking for information, in the books, in the words. Card catalogs and computers in libraries file everything, books, pamphlets, maps, charts, posters, everything, based on the words in/on them. Ditto online search engines. The problem is, you are looking for the pictures. This is a very big problem. The bigger the library, the bigger the problem. The solutions are relatively simple, if time consuming. The "sensible" library approved solution is to deeply think about the subject you are looking for, and to think of related subject headings, based on the words in the books, that might lead you to the pictures. This is a good system to begin with, (and the only one you can use with search engines) but it is still a case of working within the inefficient system. It works, sort of, but it will swallow lots of time each time you use it. It also presupposes that you know a lot about the subject you are researching before you even begin.

WHY IT WORKS

BADLY: For example, you are looking for costume ideas for a play by Chekhov written in 1905. What are the best subject headings to find costume pictures? If you answer Russian costume, Chekhov, and Russian history in 1905, you will get books showing colorful peasant dress, play scripts without pictures and lots on the Revolution of 1905, all of which will help you very little. What you needed to look up was Photography in Russia before 1917, the painters Valentin Serov and Mikhail Vrubel, the history of the Moscow Art Theatre and Konstantin Stanislavsky, and the costume collection of the Hermitage Museum. How do you find this out? There is no way, working within the regular library system that you can find this out except by hitting subjects at random (Russian painting, history, sculpture, engravings, photos, costume, etc., etc.) and hoping you hit one that will stick. It is different for each country and period and play. There is no escape. Or is there?

SWALLOW

THE WHOLE THING: For the long run, there is. It just costs you a lot of time at the beginning. What you will need to do is to abandon the filing system and embrace the whole library for several days. In a large university library (your best bet) you just go to the top floor and work down. You begin at the beginning of the stacks, and walk them. That is to say you look at the titles on each and every shelf, no exceptions, and when a title or a binding looks interesting, you pull it off the shelf, and look for pictures. Four out of five books you pull out will be duds. When you find a good one, write down its call number and it's subject heading. Save these notes for later. My first published Article,

PROBLEMWHY IT WORKSSWALLOWLibrary Costume Resources; A Supplementwas a list of subject headings and call numbers I compiled in just four hours of walking through the stacks of the CSU Fresno library:

KNOW

WHAT YOUR LIBRARY HAS: Most major research libraries have many sections, all of which contain information on costume, and all of which you should "walk". The main section is what is called the stacks, these are stacks of books, available for checking out and wandering through, usually filed according to the Library of Congress system. In addition to this main section are many others. First, usually extra large books are filed in an oversize book section or sections as part of the main stacks, this area contains a large proportion of costume information. The reference section has books too valuable for check out, and books that are references for other books and information. These include indexes like The Readers Guide To Periodical Literature that can help you find articles in magazines on your subject. Within the reference section is usually the reference desk collection, normally only used by the reference librarians. These are exclusively indexes useful for finding other works, including indexes of periodicals, videos, and organizations that may be useful. Also in the reference area are computer databases that list articles and books available in your library, your region, and even sometimes on the database itself. Most large libraries also have video, film and audio collections, a map collection, new and old periodicals (magazines and newspapers), rare book collections (which include not only books, but other fragile old items like photos, stereographs, fashion plates, paper dolls, posters, theatre programs, manuscripts, renderings, letters, drawings, and scrapbooks), and a regional collection (with local "rare books").

A REALLY

BIG

LIBRARY: A very large American library also is likely to be a Federal Government Depository Library, which means it will have government publications filed by an annoying system understandable only to a special librarian stationed in that section to help you. For posters of the history of American military dress, info on W.W.II civilian home made clothing, and Smithsonian publications, this is the source. The 100 biggest libraries in the US were also given, on B&W microfilm, a complete copy of all Sears Catalogs from the beginning in the late 19th Century to the 1970's (Oh, rapture!) Big universities often have to break up their libraries into several buildings across campus, and so often have a law library, science or medical library, and a business or technical library. These places need to be explored as well. For instance, at UGA those Sears Catalog microfilms live in the UGA Science Library. Books on period cutting, sewing, and millinery, will be located in a technical library if one is kept separate from the main library. Business libraries have information on unions (photos of strikers and police), servants, prostitutes, farm workers, garment workers, and the textile industry. Big libraries also have the Union List of Periodicals, and other massive library indexes useful for finding very obscure books that you may order through interlibrary loan. Many also have microfilm and microfiche collections with works too bulky to get in print. For example, the Victoria and Albert Museum has sold color microfiche copies of a large selection of the theatre costume and couture renderings in their collection to libraries, many more than could reasonably be copied in a large book.

THE

MAGIC

AP'S: Within the periodical section is one of those sections you would never likely find in a conventional catalog search, the "general interest" section known in the Library of Congress system as AP. AP's include all such general interest magazines as TimeLifeThe Ladies Home JournalGodey's Lady's Book, etc. If the main content of the magazine is not fashion, but "general interest", no matter how much fashion information is in it, it is filed in this section. Naturally since most of "women's magazines" fall into this category, it means it contains huge amounts of costume information under one, non-costume, heading. Since big libraries often have collections of magazines in this section going back to the 19th, or even 18th centuries, it is an extremely useful one for getting contemporary fashion information, photos of important figures, and even patterns for clothing, just by looking up magazines in the period you need. If your library doesn't seem to have old periodicals on the shelf, check and ask. Usually there are older volumes filed either in a separate old periodicals section, or the old volumes are on microfilm or microfiche in metal cabinets nearby.

LOOK FOR

RED BOOKS

One of the bizarre things to keep in mind is that books with lots of pictures often are in standard sizes. Art books with color reproductions of paintings are often kept in the oversize book shelves, and so this part of the library should always be checked extra carefully. Other books come in sizes that you will eventually recognize from experience to be likely picture books. Another clue is gold letters on red binding. For reasons known only to the publishing industry, very many books with this color combination also contain pictures. Pull anything that you suspect contains interesting visuals, and write down the numbers that are useful.

TAKE

NOTES

FOR LATER: While doing this systematic search for all important visual costume information in your library, you will be acquiring information even more randomly than by hunting subject headings, however you will be gathering much more visual information in total than you could do in dozens of subject searches. You also cut out the word based dead ends much more quickly, by bypassing them altogether. You may also use this system backwards with the subject heading system. That is, once you have your list of numbers and headings which are useful, you can apply them to other parts of the library like periodicals, reference, and government publications to find even more information. These sections too must be walked and mined for numbers and headings on their own. Once you do this you will be able to easily put your hands on three fourths of whatever you need for costume research for a show within an hour or less. There will still be that one fourth that obstinately will require a conventional catalog search, but by doing this walk through the stacks just once, you will have the majority of your costume research gathering done before you even start. You can then concentrate your time on using your research instead of finding it.

THE

OBSTINATE

1/4 THAT NEEDS A NORMAL SEARCH: You can shorten the search several ways. One is that you choose a wide variety of related headings, but only take enough notes to get to the right stack. That is, when looking for Inuit dress for the children's show The Ice Wolf, you look up Inuitdress, art, textiles, history, photographs, tools, religion, Native American costume, art, textiles, history, photographs, tools, religion, and circumpolar dress, art, etc. in the catalog, making the broadest possible search, but you do not write down or print out every number. Instead, you look at the numbers in each subject section, and write down only one each of similar numbers. This is enough to bring you to the proper shelf, where you can hunt using the visual system. If a particular title in the catalog seems promising, right down that number as the sample number for it's section. This way you can often find a hundred books while only writing down a dozen numbers. Another important option in conducting a normal search is to ask a reference librarian for help. Reference librarians have MA's in library science, which means they spent two whole years studying library systems, research, and reference books. In a conventional search, they are the unquestioned experts, and can often shorten your time spent considerably. Taking a course or two in library science yourself, will also make doing conventional searches faster.

FILE IT

IN YOUR HEAD: Over a very long time, of course, there is another solution. You learn enormous amounts about costume history, and can retrieve them from memory. To do this, you need to make a point of checking out and reading/looking at all the good books you find, one by one, till you can accurately do period shows, without a large scale research search. To do this kind of systematic mining of costume information for your lifetime, I recommend Janet Arnold's A Handbook of Costume, which contains "the word" on how to do costume research from the leading costume historian in the world. Janet said, among other things, that costume research does not stop with picture books, but should also take you to museums, archives, and old houses to see actual garments, paintings, sculpture, accessories, legal documents like patent records, and so forth. Ms Arnold practiced what she preached. The costume world knew Ms. Arnold was the most determined and dedicated costume researcher when her Patterns of Fashion 3, came out, and we saw she had made patterns from 16-17th Century clothing that was in an advanced state of decay. The decay came from the fact that these garments were grave clothes and had spent a long time with a decaying body in each one. (Yuck!) Thinking about the dedication it must have took for Ms. Arnold to do this should convince anyone that library research, even with all it's difficulties, is, comparatively, a piece of cake.

A LOW

DIRTY

TRICK: While I do not recommend this method for anyone who is not truly desperate, it does work. If you are truly "stuck" on a particular costume (usually a uniform in my experience), and are in some remote place where you cannot possibly drive to the next city to look for further information, and you have exhausted all the local sources, you can go to the video store. (WHAT!!!) Yes, sometimes you have no alternative. For example, in Fairbanks, Alaska I had looked for days in the largest library in the State for a picture of a prisoner in a 1953 Russian gulag winter uniform. The best I got was the fuzzy B&W photo of Solzhenitsyn, from the waist up, in The Gulag Archipelago. I needed something clear, in color, and full length. So, I rented A Day in the Life of Ivan Desinovitch, and took notes. The reason that doing this is not advisable, except in an emergency, is that if the film costumer had made a mistake in research, I would have promptly perpetuated it. However, one may generally avoid this by being careful about which movies one rents, and which pieces one steals from them. One should never, for instance, steal costumes worn on leads, because usually they are altered to suit the fashions of the period the film was made in. It is both unnecessary, and dangerous to take bits of fashionable, non-uniform dress from movies, since you can get this information elsewhere, and these parts too are sometimes altered. Movies done before 1960 are often highly fanciful in terms of costume, as are deliberately stylized movies like Bram Stoker's DraculaThe Boy Friend, and anything directed by Ken Russell. In general, the best films to steal from are large budget, post 1960 English made films, and post 1970 European films. There are many highly historically accurate American made films, particularly westerns, but there are an equal number of fanciful, and plain sloppy ones, so it isn't safe as a bet. For more on the alteration of costume history in film costume read The LA County Museum of Art's Hollywood and History, and Seeing Through Clothes by Anne Hollander. The safest films in terms of uniform hunting are those with Berman's and Nathan's, Angel's or Cosprop as the costume makers, and John Mollo as consultant or designer. So this means if you just got stuck to do The Cherry Orchard, and can't find what a Turn of the Century Russian station master, student, and post man look like, you can rent Nicholas and Alexandra, and Dr. Zhivago, and make do, because these two films contain those three uniforms between them.

AN

INDUSTRIAL

REVOLUTION IN RESEARCH: Using this system will speed up your research considerably. However, there is something else that will speed it up more. The Xerox machine can, if you let it, double your time on top of it. The first secret is getting a library copy card, so you don't mess about with dimes. Then, when you have found your books, do not check them out, but rather, in the library, quickly scan for what you want and copy it. Return to the stacks and get more books. Copy them. Repeat. You can walk out of the library in under three hours, with all the pertinent information from 100 books, in a small folder. This saves considerable hauling, and leaves the books back at the library, where others who are working on the same show can get at them. If you staple up these folders into booklets each time you do this, you will end up with a compact research library of specialized period information. As things are, back home, you will have only one booklet to look through for your source material, as compared with fumbling around through dozens scattered all over your room.

WRITING

RESEARCH PAPERS AND ARTICLES: Because most costume jobs and training in the U.S. are connected with academia, costumers also must, as students and professors, write research papers with footnotes and quotes. You may speed up your research from word based sources by using the above Xerox system with a few alterations. First, you must, when gathering up your books, make a list of the author, title, date, and publisher of each book. Then assign each of these titles an abbreviation, also written down. Then as you copy relevant pages out of the books, write the abbreviation and page number of the book on the back of each Xerox. When at home, read the pages, putting highlighter on those sections you think you wish to use as quotes and footnotes. Divide the pages of quotes by subject, then order each section, and each page in a section, into the order in which you wish to discuss your topics. If necessary, cut and paste pieces of pages into proper order, but always remember to keep note of the abbreviation and page for each part you use. When it is all in order, you may start writing. You will find your writing will easily follow the path of your source material with a flow you have rarely felt before. As you use some part of the Xeroxes in reference or quotation, you may easily footnote it by comparing the abbreviation on the Xerox with the list you made at the beginning. All this saves days of inefficient fumbling about with stacks of books, and also makes it far harder to lose or forget small references. Staple together this sort of research too, and you'll have a source book to check back on if you need it later.

KNOWBIGMAGICRED BOOKSNOTESOBSTINATEFILE ITDIRTYINDUSTRIALWRITINGINSTANT RESEARCH PAPERS

Three People have written in with improvements to my ideas! Here they are:

I just stumbled onto your _Research Heresy_ article, and what a great find! I work as an image researcher (mostly historical stuff) and have discovered many of the same tricks that you mention. I swear I can smell a heavily illustrated book from a distance at this point!

I also have a Master's in Library Science, and would like to share a little secret to help narrow down catalog searches. The official Library of Congress Subject Heading for "lots and lots of images" is PICTORIAL. Sometimes I'll do a catalog search on a broad topic keyword (such as Civil Rights) plus the keyword "pictorial." One of the advantages of this method is that I can request that a specific book be returned to the library if it's checked out, whereas I would have missed it entirely by browsing the stacks.

Keep up the good work, and happy hunting!

Sincerely,

You seem to have developed the same research style I did - pillage and burn through the right sectors, scavenging anything that looks useful. Two refinements to the technique. Make a photocopy of the title page to use for the bibliography information. And, keep a notebook to list of what you have looked at and whether it seems useful for the current or future projects. I have a long list of books to ignore, a list of books that would be useful on other projects, and those that are good for the current one. (I'm a technical writer not a costumer, but research is research.) ---

I also read you article on research and enjoyed it. I am also a trawl-net bibliophile. I have a tip to add: rather than using abbreviations to track photocopies of materials to be footnoted I write the call no. on a small <post-it> and Xerox the ISBN page at the beginning of the book with the post-it attached, this page has author/title/publisher/date/LC# on it so I don't have to copy them out... then I slap the post-it in the margin of each page I copy... the yellow is invisible to most B&W copiers and the call

number links me to the copy of the bibliographic info and will lead me directly to the book on the stack shelf if I have to go back and pull it again... I developed this procedure as well as copying from back to front (in order to avoid collating after the fact) in the course of my information-panning all libraries large and small that ever cross my path." ---Dan Wasserman Coord. Adult Education, St. Louis Art Museum e-mail:

SAVING

MATERIAL FOR POSTERITY: Before everyone crucifies me for encouraging the deforestation of the planet through copious Xeroxing, please let me tell you about another endangered resource: research material itself. It is an unfortunate fact that nearly all paper made and used for books and magazines from about 1820-1990 was acid based paper. This means nearly every book, newspaper and magazine produced during that time is on paper that ultimately self destructs, like a time bomb. The libraries of the world are in a crisis over what is to be done to save these resources. To save the information on this paper requires highly expensive de-acidification or moderately expensive copying, or comparatively inexpensive microfilming. The simple economics of library funding means that libraries will mostly use microfilm, (which is troublesome for costumers), as well as have to pick and choose which books and magazines are "important" enough to go to the expense of copying. I need hardly tell you where items like Turn of the Century

sally_jacobs@pleasantco.comCallie@writepage.com nul@aol.comSAVING tailoring and

millinery manuals will rate in this lifeboat situation. Therefore, for the good of future costumers, including one's self, we each need to notice when books like this are on the shelf of our local library falling apart. A book that is coming apart is a book whose days are numbered, soon to be thrown out. In the case of some pre 1910 catalogs, and drafting and sewing manuals, you may be looking at the last one of it's kind. The libraries can't afford to save all of them, so, you need to grab these books, before they are gone, plain paper copy them onto an acid free paper like Copysource, and bind up the copies, so they can replace the originals. At present I'm trying to copy dozens of them into paperless online format so that many people can have them at once. If each of us does this with a few books, we will save these endangered resources, as well as quickly and cheaply expand our own private libraries of rare research works. Expanding your personal library also saves lots of time doing research.

THE

NON-LAZY

, LAZY MECHANIC: If all this time efficiency still seems like "cheating" to you, relax. Just because you can do your research in a rush, you needn't do so. In fact, if you are a research junkie like me, it just means you can get three or four times as much information in the same time as you used to do before. In terms of the costume and academic food chains, this is often the difference between having enough research material to feed your work on, or having all your work time eaten away by a research project.

Links:

Tips (for reenactors)

Secondary Sources

Research Techniques

INSTANT RESEARCH PAPERS

Product Links

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