COSTUMES.ORG -- THE COSTUMER'S MANIFESTO WIKI

History100pages18thmen1

The Costumer's Manifesto: 18th Century Men's Dress

18th Century Men's Dress

AccessoriesBagsmuffs&pocketsHogarthfop.gif

I ride in a chair with my hands in a muff

And have bought a silk coat and embroidered the cuff

But the weather was cold and the coat was thin

So the tailor advised me to line it with skin:

But what with my Nivernois hat can compare

Bag, wig and laced ruffled, and black solitaire?

And what can a man of true fashion denote

Like an ell of good ribbon tyed under the throat?

My buckles and box are of exquisite taste

The one is of paper the other of paste.

AccessoriesTies&cravatsSolitaire.gif a"solitaitre" bow tie from Diderot

AccessoriesTies&cravatsStock.gif a more typical"stock" collar

Scenes from the life of a rich Aristocrat in France c. 1770:

b.asp?id=1169@160x120.jpg Available from the Nightmare Factory

b.asp?id=1169@160x120.jpg [1]

18thcentMen524042.jpgGreeting an attractive ballet dancer in one's box at the theatre.

18thcentMen524040.jpgGoing out to a formal evening with one's wife.

18thcentMen524043.jpg Being measured for a new suit of court clothes by a suitably servile tailor.

The Enlightenment caused a number of changes inmen’s ideal image. Intelligence and wit were prized above physical prowess of anykind and the army became a profession only resorted to by the poorer, younger sons of thenobility. Military dress played less of a part in the fashion inspiration for men’sclothes as a result, and women’s dress, Asiatic dress, and Country clothing wereturned to as sources of inspiration instead.

GeneralMcclellanBanyancap.jpg A"

Banyan" (Asian style robe) and turban like cap for wearing at home, inspired byPersian (Iranian) dress. Well to do intellectual men often had themselvespainted "at home" in their Banyans, instead of in formal full dress.

18thcentMenMan1750.gif

18thcentBoehn1778militarystick.jpg military man with walking stickfrom Max von Boehn's Das Beiwerk der Mode, 1928

It should be noted that In England at this time period highfashion and everyday dress for the nobility became separated into two distinct entities,for example, a mid-18th Century English Duke might wear laces, gilt embroidery and velvetsat a formal occasion yet wear simple dark Quaker built clothes during the day, almostindistinguishable from what a middle class shopkeeper might wear.

The Dominant style in the the early part of thecentury was with the formal mode of dress which gradually phased out, until in 1800,almost all that was left was the informal day dress. Throughout the century the two stylesexisted side-by-side, usually cut along the same lives and only distinguished by color,fabric and trimming.

Go on to:

The Cut ofMen's Clothes 1700-1800

Patterns For The Drawing Below and other Men's Clothing,available at

The 18th Century Pattern Page.

18thcentPatternsMan437.gif

Contemporary text

lookup?num=3361@160x120.jpg Project Gutenberg Edition of Letters to His Son by the Earl of Chesterfield

Getting dressed in the 18th Century:

watch?v=4GBhKrwdqjo&feature=related@160x120.jpg YouTube - Dangerous Liaisons Opening

e154.htm@160x120.jpg 18th Century Men and Waistcoats

kt94_475.html@160x120.jpg DHM, Everyday Life Culture II, Textiles, Man's dress suit 1750/1770

18th Century Men's Hair and Wigs

menswear.htm@160x120.jpg CHS: Costume and Textile Collection: Colonial Era Men's Wear

Men's Fashion History Links Page

index.html@160x120.jpg The Society of 18th-Century Gentlemen

clothing.html@160x120.jpg The Society of 18th-Century Gentlemen: Clothing

waistcoats.htm@160x120.jpg The Ruben's Man | Waistcoats

http://www.robothumb.com/src/http://search.famsf.org/4d.acgi$Record?202204&=list&=1&=costume%20england&=And&=2&=0&=keywords&=Yes&=&=&=&=Yes&=&=f@160x120.jpg FAMSF: Gentleman's Court Suit 1780-1785

http://www.robothumb.com/src/http://search.famsf.org/4d.acgi$Record?40743&=list&=51&=Camus&=And&=59&=0&=keywords&=Yes&=&=&=&=Yes&=&=f@160x120.jpg FAMSF: Gentleman in Court Dress 1788

clothing.html@160x120.jpg The Society of 18th-Century Gentlemen

male_rococo.html@160x120.jpg 18th century surviving male costumes

kt94_477.html@160x120.jpg DHM, Everyday Life Culture II, Textiles, Pantaloon

kt94_475.html@160x120.jpg DHM, Everyday Life Culture II, Textiles, Man's dress suit

Product Links

The Three-Piece Suit and Modern Masculinity The Three-Piece Suit and Modern Masculinity

Colonial Wig Colonial Wig

The Man of Fashion: Peacock Males and Perfect Gentlemen

A History of Men's Fashion A History of Men's Fashion

Dramatic Works of the Marquis de Sade Dramatic Works of the Marquis de Sade

Number Six Cologne Spray - 3 oz. Number Six Cologne Spray - 3 oz.

How To Dance through Time Vol. IV: The Elegance of Baroque Social Dance How To Dance through Time Vol. IV: The Elegance of Baroque Social Dance

The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France

This Page is part of The Costumer's Manifesto, originally founded by Tara Maginnis, Ph.D. from 1996-2014, now flying free as a wiki for all to edit and contribute. Site maintained, hosted, and wikified by Andrew Kahn. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details. You may print out any of these pages for non-profit educational use such as school papers, teacher handouts, or wall displays. You may link to any page in this site.