COSTUMES.ORG -- THE COSTUMER'S MANIFESTO WIKI

Advice1pagesPhoto4portfoliocc04b

The Costumer's Manifesto: Photographing Your Costumes for Your Portfolio,Onstage and in the Studio Photographing Your Costumes for Your Portfolio,

Onstage and in the Studio

With Tara Maginnis

Basic Terminology:

Camera Types:

SLR (Single Lens Reflex) Pro-type film camera, good adaptability, difficult to learn, but can produce highest quality results.

Snapshot Camera Simple film camera, easy to use, cheap, but very limited in what it can do.

Digital Cameras Do not use film, so they pay for themselves quickly, despite being fairly pricey.Models now available range from junk that makes disposable snapshot cameras look good, to fancy professional models that can do anything an SLR can do and more.Quality of images is counted in Mega pixels.Do not bother getting anything below 3MP. Most digital cameras are easier to operate than a normal SLR, but less easy than a snapshot camera.

Film Speed:

Fast film (400asa and higher) is good for low light and/or fast movement. 400asa is the slowest film you would dare use to film a brightly lit show indoors.

Slow Film (360asa and lower) is good when using a tripod to photograph still objects for a long exposure, or for color- rich photos taken in bright outdoor light.

Film Type:

Daylight film(what you can buy anywhere), color is correct for outdoors and with flash, but will tint orange under incandescent and stage lights.Tints a little green-gray under fluorescent light.

Tungsten film (For sale in specialty camera stores and online), color is correct for incandescent/stage lights, but tints blue outdoors in daylight.Also tints a little bit green-gray under fluorescent light.

I've just bought (in July 2006) the greatest point-and-shoot digital camera for taking low-light stage photos, macro images for how-to instructions, and high-res images for costume books:It has ridiculously good low-light "speed", anti-shake, and is mindlessly easy to use.

AmazonBooksThemagicgarment.gif

AmazonComputersCanoneosd30.gif

AmazonOtherMinoltadimagef100.jpg

(What I scan with now)

AmazonBooks1019thcentfashdetail.jpeg

AmazonBooksThemagicgarment.gif

AmazonComputersCanoneosd30.gif

AmazonOtherMinoltadimagef100.jpg

(my own new camera)

Hints for taking Portfolio PicturesThe Simon/Maginnis Family method: Take LOTS of photos and throw out the bad ones.If for some reason you can’t take photos of an event, consider doing the wedding reception method: hand out lots of cameras to everyone, then gather them up, process the pictures, and see what you get.

YarkaProfessional Water Color Set (What I Use) These 2 nice people who I know were handed my 2 cameras just minutes before a one-shot fashion show where I could not take pictures myself. I literally grabbed them from the ticket line handed them each a camera and lots of film, and said "just photograph anything, as best you can" The three other photos you see are some of their duds, but the great ones you see just below, are the cream of the 200+ photos they took.

Photo4portfolioLiveFashionshow1.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveMaginn-r1-12 3.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveMaginn-r1-15 4.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveMaginn-r1-2 3.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveMaginn-r1-6.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveMaginn-r1-6 6.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveMaginn-r1-e221.jpg

“Not even Kodak can take pictures yesterday”.Don’t put it off.Start taking photos while you are building the costume and don’t stop till you have several good shots of every aspect of the costume.A digital camera often encourages this because of its photos’ cheapness.

Photo4portfolioWorkingdetailsTomato.jpg

Photo4portfolioWorkingdetailsAlicefoam.jpg

Photo4portfolioWorkingdetailsShelips.jpg

Photo4portfolioWorkingdetailsSlimehead.jpg These portfolio pages show working details that were part of the building process.

Sometimes you can't get photos of a costume being used by the performer. This is no excuse for neglecting to photograph it. These photos all show costumes before they left the shop, posed on shop staff or mannequins:

Photo4portfolioWorkingdetailsEarlyheaddresses.jpg

Photo4portfolioModelsofconvenienceStar.jpg

Photo4portfolioModelsofconvenienceStatue1.jpg

Photo4portfolioModelsofconvenienceStatue2.jpg

Photo4portfolioModelsofconvenienceStrawberry.jpg

Photograph important details up close.These are photographed best with bright, diffused lighting. You can use squares of heavy buckram as a diffuser on a clip light.If you are doing photos outdoors pick an overcast day, or get a couple of friends to hold a white bed sheet over your costume like a giant diffuser.

Photo4portfolioLowcontrast931200-r1-9.jpg High contrast lighting like this kills details, especially on monochromatic costumes. Diffusing your light, and pulling in closer will get you photos like this:

Photo4portfolioPosingforms07420004.jpg

Long shots of posed costumes are less effective than close-ups, note how much better the costume looks when you go in for the "costume porn" shots:

Photo4portfolioCloseupBrothers1.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupBrothers7.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupBrothers6.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupMerteuil5.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupConspiritors1.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupConspiritors5crop.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseup2in1b.jpg

Photo4portfolioLowcontrastValmont2.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupValmontwatch2.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupValmont.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupPict0129.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupPict0132.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupPict0133.jpg

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutPict0122.jpg

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutPict0123.jpg

In your portfolio these close-ups can be laid out in multiple juxtapositions, that can show close and long together, multiple costumes, or multiple details of one costume:

Photo4portfolioCloseup2in1b.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupSuit2for1.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseupTamino2.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseup3potrick.jpg

Photo4portfolioCloseup697502-r1-32.jpg

Photo4portfolioLowcontrastVintagerobes.jpg

Get a cheap tripod especially for studio shots.Then you can use slow film 200asa and lower for these shots to get the best color and detail. You can also take good photos of yourself in costume using a camera’s timer.

Photo4portfolioAbstractSloppysuits.jpg After a show is over, if you still need to get good shots of the costumes, using a dress form, slow film, and a tripod, will make the costumes look so much nicer than with a costume on a hanger taken with fast film or a flash. These set up shots could have controlled lighting, and a long exposure for maximum saturation and minimum contrast:

Photo4portfolioAbstract259300-r1-19.jpg

Photo4portfolioAbstract259300-r1-24.jpg

Photo4portfolioAbstract4kimono.jpg

Photo4portfolioAbstractPaintedsuits2.jpg

Photo4portfolioAbstractPict0085.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutMaginn-r1-24 2.jpg

Clip lamps are a great thing, you can buy lots of them because they are cheap, but even if you use “Reveal” bluish looking bulbs, the light coming off them is orangey-yellow (tungsten), this means you will need to color correct some way, either with a blue filter on the camera, blue gels on the lights, tungsten (not daylight) film, or a lot of fiddling in Photoshop later.

Examples of studio set-ups I've used using everything from clip-lights to stage lights:

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutPict0034.jpg

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutPict0049.jpg As you can see the clip lamps are simply attached to anything that can be used to hold them. Background of paper.

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutPict0126.jpg Another paper background.

Photo4portfolioStudiolayout697501-r1-30.jpg

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutFlowersuit.jpg

Photo4portfolioLowcontrastPict0066.jpg

Photo4portfolioLowcontrastPict0069.jpg This rear-lit nylon setup allows one to change the background color by changing a gel on just one light.

Mannequins look great if you spend just a few minutes adjusting and pinning the costume so it looks like a big puppet of the character.You can fatten out arms just by stuffing net into the cut off legs of a pair of pantyhose. Consider posing multiple characters together in relationships.

(My Dad's Camera- film speed up to 800 ASA)

(Higher quality pictures, but only up to 400 ASA)

Photo4portfolioPosingforms07420004.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingforms07420013.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingforms07420027.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingforms931000-r1-15.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingformsFans.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingformsGwen12.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingformsGwen32.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingformsGwen34.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingformsMaginn-r1-4 1.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingformsMaginn-r1-5 3.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingformsSisters.jpg

Photo4portfolioPosingformsSisters27.jpgYou can make a great neutral backdrop for photos by sewing together two bed sheets.Put one end beneath the mannequin, and hoist the other over the top bar of a rolling rack, or a curtain rod.

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutMaginn-r1-15.jpg

Photo4portfolioLowcontrastValmont2.jpg 2 sewn together bed sheets and some clip lamps.

Photograph costumes on the performer(s) while they are in character.If you can’t get the original performer(s), make sure your live model(s) or mannequin(s) stands in a characteristic attitude, not just like a lump.

Photo4portfolioPhotocallBoys.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallCabaret3.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallKartastcast1.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallTarot.jpg

For photographing live performances use “fast” film, 400asa or HIGHER if you can’t use a flash.Usually a flash is a bad idea even if it is allowed.

Photo4portfolioLiveAlice2.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveAlice3.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveBacchae.jpg "Live" shots give you lots of character and context for your costume, but are bad for details. Ideally you want to get "live" shots like these you can lay out in your portfolio next to more detailed posed shots, to give context to your renderings and/or close-ups.

Photo4portfolioLiveBirdboy.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveLysistrata.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveMuchado1.jpg

Photo4portfolioLiveMuchado2.jpg

WHEN TO SHOOT THE ACTORS: Good times to snap during a live show are at still moments, and at the ends of actions like the momentary "freeze" at the end of a musical number, or the second's pause of reaction in a fight. Even in a dancer's leap, the point at which the body is fully extended in the leap, is held a moment longer than the motions leading to it, and is besides, more visually exciting to look at.

Photo4portfolioAt rest12thnight.jpg

Photo4portfolioAt restDick1.jpg

Photo4portfolioAt restMvc-013f.jpg

Photo4portfolioAt restUntitled13.jpg

Photo4portfolioExtension006 nr.jpg

Photo4portfolioExtension12thnight2.jpg

Try to get a formal “photo call” for posed shots of at least 2 hours put into the rehearsal/performance schedule for the show as early as possible so everyone expects it (the least annoying time is often just after the 1st Sunday matinee).Work out (with the other members of the production team) a list of which scenes you want to photograph, who is in them, and in what order, and make sure everyone has a copy so the process moves fast.Since these are posed shots you can use a tripod.

Photo4portfolioPhotocall2pix.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallLucyspell.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallFlutekadephotos.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallValmont.jpg If you must choose just one person on your production team to take photocall shots, a lighting designer is often the best choice. These photos were taken by Theatre UAF's Kade Mendelowitz, who was able to set up the shots so you could see all the amazing lighting and special effects in addition to the actors.

Photo4portfolioPhotocallLiaisons2.jpg Here you can see the advantages and disadvantages of both posed and live shots. The photo in the top left, by Kade, has perfect posing, grain and lighting, but is a little stiff. The others (by me) of the show as it played live, are grainy and imperfect but very spontaneous looking.

Photo4portfolioPhotocallMrsx.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallMrsx3.jpg Sometimes the best way to show the costume is to pull it out of context. The incredible fragile foofyness of the costume (requested by the director) contrasted with the uptight nature of the character being played made for a series of awkward poses on stage. Not till after closing the show could the poor actress relax in the costume enough to look comfortable- a process aided by my asking her to jump, roll around in it, and not worry about damaging it.

Even a whiny uncooperative cast will willingly line up to pose for you backstage in character in costume if you tell them that you are taking their photos as their opening night gifts, and then order double prints so you can give them photos of themselves, and have a set to keep.

Photo4portfolioPhotocallMikadophotcall.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallPitti1.jpg For this show we had a few "pills" in the cast who didn't want to take time to pose for photo call, potentially ruining things for everyone else. I set up a space for a costume photo call in a spare classroom and told the willing that they could pose (or not) at will and so get photos in their costumes. This got me, and the actors who wanted them, portfolio pictures without all of us having to endure an hour or two of complaining by the pills.

If you do renderings, make sure that you also get a photo of the costume that demonstrates how closely it resembles your original drawing.You can ask performers to pose in a manner similar to your drawing, or choose a “live” onstage shot where the performer is in a similar pose.

Photo4portfolioPhotocallMrsx.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutPish.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutTourvel.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutMikadolayout2.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotocallLiaisons1.jpg

If your costume involves a spectacularly transforming makeup, make sure to get a face photo of the performer both with the makeup and without, so people can see the “before and after” difference.

If you have done something clever to make the costume that isn’t obvious while it is worn, do a detail photo of the inside where you have hidden your secret.

Photo4portfolioWorkingdetailsLionhat.jpg

Photo4portfolioWorkingdetailsEarlyheaddresses.jpg Sometimes what you've done can't be seen unless you demonstrate it. This page from my portfolio contains an image of a delicate looking crown with fleur de lys tips, with a stage weight balancing on the tips to show how I reinforced it internally.

Learn to use Adobe Photoshop (Adobe Photoshop Elements is fine too) for fixing color problems, removing extraneous background details, and combining photos into portfolio layouts.

Photo4portfolioPhotoshopMourningsuit.jpg Photoshop can be used to adjust color correctly to compensate for the use of daylight film indoors.

Photo4portfolioPhotoshopPolly2.jpg Here you can see on the left a photo taken with tungsten lighting and daylight film, on the right, a flash is used to fix the color, but as you can see this simply flattens out the image and obscures details.

Photo4portfolioPhotoshopPolly1.jpg Here, the photo on the left is color corrected in Photoshop instead, which while far from perfect, loses less depth than using the flash.

Photo4portfolioPhotoshopFixassignment.jpg

Photo4portfolioPhotoshopUmbrelaproject.jpg Photoshop can also be used to perform more amazing "fixes" on photos, in this case adjusting an under-exposed shot, and colorizing a B&W shot. These fixes are time consuming, but very useful if you have a backlog of poor images of costumes or shows which you can't re-shoot.

Portfolio page layouts (whether done in Photoshop or by normal scrap booking methods) are especially effective if they include multiple images of a costume.An ideal layout might include a rendering, a build and/or detail shot, a show shot, and a posed close-up.Swatches help too.

Photo4portfolioLayoutAlicequeen.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutAliceteaparty.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutEarnestcoatswhite.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutKartasititle.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutMikadolayout1.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutMikadolayout2.jpg

Photo4portfolioLayoutPish.jpg

Photo4portfolioLowcontrastWeddingdresspage.jpg

You should try with your portfolio to state in simple visual terms what it is that you can do, by showing pictures of what you have done. Ideally, the portfolio should be clear even to somebody who cannot read the captions. HOWEVER, LABEL EVERYTHING ANYWAY SO PEOPLE LOOKING AT YOUR PORTFOLIO ARE SURE TO KNOW WHAT THEY ARE SEEING.

For more info see my online article on taking Stage Photos of live shows:

PHOTO.HTM@160x120.jpg http://www.costumes.org/ADVICE/1pages/PHOTO.HTM

For designing your portfolio, see my article on Costume portfolios at

PORTFOLI.HTM@160x120.jpg http://www.costumes.org/ADVICE/1pages/PORTFOLI.HTM

The main two keys to building good portfolios are simple: collect information (renderings, sketches, swatches, photos, etc.) on everything you do, and edit and remount the new information you have every six to twelve months.

Once you get good photos make a point of keeping them together and semi-organized so you can find them when needed.If you have them in digital form, back them up and store the backups with a willing relative or friend.

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutBinders2.jpg How I sort my 20 years or so of portfolio information.

File:Photo4portfolioWorkingdetailsPict0047.jpg Don't miss getting pictures of your self and co workers while you are at it. This can help you to get puff pieces about your costumes (or theirs) featured in local newspapers. This is a photo I took of my costume shop manager (and the maker of this coat) while I was doing all those close set up shots.

Materials to make your own temporary photo studio:

Camera & tripod

Dress forms, head/hat stands, mannequins as available for displaying the costume items.

Chairs, boxes & stools to hold small items up to a level where they can be photographed, and/or to serve as lamp holders.

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutPict0099.jpg You can even use related objects to help "pose" an item.

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutPict0102.jpg

Photo4portfolioStudiolayoutPict0155.jpg

Hat racks, music stands, or any upright poles for clip lamps to grab on.

Clip lights, or various lamps with the shades taken off. A bright sunny window with a white sheet across it as a diffuser. AS MUCH LIGHT AS POSSIBLE, ANY WAY YOU CAN MANAGE IT.

Bed sheets, bulk fabric yardage in various colors, or roll paper for background.

Clothesline, clothing rack or pole to hold up the background

Extension cords with power strip surge suppressors for safety and easy turn-off of multiple lights between shots.

Buckram squares, theatrical light gels, colored squares of silk to diffuse and tint the lights. Clothespins to hold them onto clip lights.

Nylon stockings, netting, fiberfill, clothes hanger wire to make bendable “arms” for a costume on an armless dress form.

Crumpled newspapers to fill out skirts or sleeve puffs to correct fullness.

Duct tape, for keeping lights in place, heads on mannequins, and the background taught and smooth.

Straight pins, and fishing line for invisibly getting figures to pose as desired.

Instructor:Tara Maginnis, Ph.D. is the costume designer and an Associate Professor of the Theatre Department of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. However, she is best known for her creation of The Costumer's Manifesto, the Web's largest, and most eclectic, costume site at costumes.org@160x120.jpg http://costumes.org

She has also written numerous articles on costume design and related topics for TD&TCRJThe Ladies Gallery, and Costume. You can view her costume designs online at SHOWS.HTM@160x120.jpg http://www.costumes.org/SHOWS/100pages/SHOWS.HTM

For photographing related items see these links:

@160x120.jpg The Vintage Connection

PhotographingYourCollection.htm@160x120.jpg Photographing Your Collection of Antique & Vintage Fashions

HowToCleanStoreDisplayAntiqueVintageFashions.htm@160x120.jpg How To Clean, Store, & Display Antique & Vintage Fashions

1photo.htm@160x120.jpg Society of American Silversmiths - Photo Tips for Metalsmiths

phmain.htm@160x120.jpg Wayne Anderson's Guide to Photographing Costumes

@160x120.jpg www.fanfotography.com home page

Photos of a cheap and easy jewelry photographing setup like those described above

photographingyourwork.asp@160x120.jpg Art UW - Artist Tips - Photographing Your Work

lophmain.htm@160x120.jpg Wayne Anderson's Guide to Photographing Costumes

photogr_carnival.htm@160x120.jpg CARIWAVE - Photographing Carnival

This page last edited on

Product Links

Amazon.com Fujifilm FinePix F30 6.3 MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Zoom Camera & Photo

From Page to Stage : How Theatre Designers Make Connections Between Scripts and Images From Page to Stage : How Theatre Designers Make Connections Between Scripts and Images

Costume Design : Techniques of Modern Masters Costume Design : Techniques of Modern Masters

Drawing the Head and Figure Drawing the Head and Figure

The Figure : An Approach to Drawing and Construction The Figure : An Approach to Drawing and Construction

Draw Fashion Models! (Discover Drawing) Draw Fashion Models! (Discover Drawing)

The Magic Garment : Principles of Costume Design

Figure Templates for Fashion Illustration : Over 150 Templates for Fashion Design Figure Templates for Fashion Illustration : Over 150 Templates for Fashion Design

Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers

A Handbook of Costume Drawing : A Guide to Drawing the Period Figure for Costume Design Students A Handbook of Costume Drawing : A Guide to Drawing the Period Figure for Costume Design Students

Canon EOS D30 Digital Camera Kit

Fashion Sketching: Drawing the Fashion Figure Fashion Sketching: Drawing the Fashion Figure

Minolta Dimage F100 4MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom

The Costume Technician's Handbook : A Complete Guide for Amateur and Professional Costume Technicians The Costume Technician's Handbook : A Complete Guide for Amateur and Professional Costume Technicians

The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain

Hewlett Packard Scanjet 3400Cse Hewlett Packard Scanjet 3400Cse

Canon CanoScan N1220U USB Flatbed Scanner Canon CanoScan N1220U USB Flatbed Scanner

Peterson's Breaking into Film : Making Your Career Search a Blockbuster Peterson's Breaking into Film : Making Your Career Search a Blockbuster

Nineteenth-Century Fashion in Detail

From Page to Stage : How Theatre Designers Make Connections Between Scripts and Images From Page to Stage : How Theatre Designers Make Connections Between Scripts and Images

Costume Design : Techniques of Modern Masters Costume Design : Techniques of Modern Masters

Drawing the Head and Figure Drawing the Head and Figure

The Figure : An Approach to Drawing and Construction The Figure : An Approach to Drawing and Construction

Draw Fashion Models! (Discover Drawing) Draw Fashion Models! (Discover Drawing)

The Magic Garment : Principles of Costume Design

Figure Templates for Fashion Illustration : Over 150 Templates for Fashion Design Figure Templates for Fashion Illustration : Over 150 Templates for Fashion Design

Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers

A Handbook of Costume Drawing : A Guide to Drawing the Period Figure for Costume Design Students A Handbook of Costume Drawing : A Guide to Drawing the Period Figure for Costume Design Students

Photographing People: Portraits - Fashion - Glamour Photographing People: Portraits - Fashion - Glamour

Canon EOS D30 Digital Camera Kit

Fashion Sketching: Drawing the Fashion Figure Fashion Sketching: Drawing the Fashion Figure

Minolta Dimage F100 4MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom

Canon PowerShot S200 2MP Digital ELPH Camera w/ 2x Optical Zoom Canon PowerShot S200 2MP Digital ELPH Camera w/ 2x Optical Zoom

Minolta Dimage X 2MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom Minolta Dimage X 2MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom

Essential Fashion Design : Illustration, Theme Boards, Body Coverings, Projects, Portfolios Essential Fashion Design : Illustration, Theme Boards, Body Coverings, Projects, Portfolios

Essential Fashion Design : Illustration, Theme Boards, Body Coverings, Projects, Portfolios Essential Fashion Design : Illustration, Theme Boards, Body Coverings, Projects, Portfolios

YarkaProfessional Water Color Set (What I Use) Canon PowerShot S200 2MP Digital ELPH Camera w/ 2x Optical Zoom YarkaProfessional Water Color Set (What I Use) Canon PowerShot S200 2MP Digital ELPH Camera w/ 2x Optical Zoom

Watercolor Basics People : People Watercolor Basics People : People

Premiere [MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION] Premiere [MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION]

Drawing Lessons from the Great Masters Drawing Lessons from the Great Masters

Canon PowerShot S30 3MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom Canon PowerShot S30 3MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom

Canon PowerShot S40 4MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom Canon PowerShot S40 4MP Digital Camera w/ 3x Optical Zoom

Fashion Shots (Pro-Lighting Series) Fashion Shots (Pro-Lighting Series)

Lighting Techniques for Fashion and Glamour Photography Lighting Techniques for Fashion and Glamour Photography

The Costume Designer's Handbook : A Complete Guide for Amateur and Professional Costume Designers The Costume Designer's Handbook : A Complete Guide for Amateur and Professional Costume Designers

Virtual Pose : The Ultimate Visual Reference Series for Drawing the Human Figure (contains a CD-ROM) Virtual Pose : The Ultimate Visual Reference Series for Drawing the Human Figure (contains a CD-ROM)

This Page is part of The Costumer's Manifesto, originally founded by Tara Maginnis, Ph.D. from 1996-2014, now flying free as a wiki for all to edit and contribute. Site maintained, hosted, and wikified by Andrew Kahn. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details. You may print out any of these pages for non-profit educational use such as school papers, teacher handouts, or wall displays. You may link to any page in this site.